Current

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June 23, 2021 – October 24, 2021

Amerika. God Bless You If It’s Good To You is an exhibition of flat works and performance collaborations of twelve new and recent drawings and mixed media collages by Harlem-based artist Wardell Milan. Split into two parts, the exhibition explores the undergirding of contemporary America. The first portion of the exhibition, comprising new works on paper, explores the insidious normalcy of White supremacy in America. At the heart of the exhibition is the question: “What do terrorists do when they’re not terrorizing?” This inquiry pushes the artist’s assertion that racial violence is interwoven into the fabric of American life, and is an indiscriminate presence in public and private realms––from the Bayou to the Bronx. The second section of the show, which is housed in a site-specific chapel structure, designed by Billy Ray Morgan, explores the idea of “Safe Space” for communities that have been historically oppressed. This chapel space, modeled after the Rothko Chapel, will set the stage for a series of collaborative performances, choreographed by Milan and Zachary Tye Richardson, and unpack the need for safety interlinked through histories of violence; to be affirmed and celebrated. Within this chapel, these irrepressible bodies cannot be flattened but must be reckoned with. 

 

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April 28, 2021 - September 26, 2021 (extended)

Born in Flames: Feminist Futures is a constellation of imagined world-scapes projected by fourteen contemporary artists. Set within the space of an exhibition, the artwork presented is a projection of the artists’ larger visions about futurity. Each section of the show is a microcosmic speculation on what could have been, what is, or what is to come. These worlds are steeped in lessons of our complicated pasts, peppered with the ravages of oppression but also blooming joys. Their work critically examines current struggles for equity by exploring strategies for justice and equality through multifaceted futurisms. 

 

Born in Flames: Feminist Futures (Nacer En Llamas: Futuros Feministas) es una constelación de mundos-paisajes imaginados en las proyecciones de quince artistas contemporáneas. Enmarcado en el espacio de una exhibición, las obras son una proyección de las visiones ampliadas de lxs artistas acerca de la futuridad. Cada sección de la muestra es una especulación micro cósmica de lo que podría haber sido, lo que es, y lo que está por venir.  Estos mundos están impregnados de las lecciones de nuestros complicados pasados, salpicados de los estragos de la opresión, pero también de las alegrías florecientes. Sus obras examinan críticamente las luchas actuales por la equidad a través de la exploración de estrategias para la justicia y la equidad a través de futurismos multifacéticas. 

 

Upcoming

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November 10, 2021 - March 20, 2022

From November 10, 2021, to March 20, 2022, the Bronx Museum will present Bronx Calling: The Fifth AIM Biennial showcasing the work of 68 early career artists from the 2018 and 2019 cycles of the Bronx Museum’s AIM Fellowship program. Co-organized by Ian Cofre (Director, PS 122 Gallery) and Eva Mayhabal Davis (Co-Director, Transmitter), the fifth edition of Bronx Calling considers the multiple crises of health, grief, the environment, and identity that define our contemporary moment.

Past

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July 19, 2012 - June 2, 2013

Does style define man? For centuries, style has been the focus of debate whether concerning writing, behavior or fashion. Around the late 1970s, the term “wild style” began to circulate among graffiti artists in the South Bronx to denote the kind of graphics involving complex, interlocking letters with aerodynamic forms. Coined by the legendary Tracy 168, the expression became associated with the rise of graffiti art in New York City, specifically in the Bronx, in the 1970s and that ultimately became a global movement. Started as an underground movement, the “wild style” is now part of the mainstream, studied as an art form and exhibited in museums all over the world. Bronx Lab—Style Wars features a number of works that reflect on that era to pose the question of what is today’s style.


Artists include Afrika Bambaataa, Henry Chalfant, Lady K Fever, Keith Haring, Dr. Lakra, Valerie Larko, Glendalys Medina, Johnny Perez, Tim Rollins and K.O.S., Rigoberto Torres, Tats Cru

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February 12, 2012 – June 11, 2012

The MIT List Visual Arts Center in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts presents the first United States museum survey of the work of Chilean-born video artist Juan Downey (1940–1993). Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect features a selection of key works by this under-recognized pioneer of video art. A fellow at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual studies in 1973 and 1975, Downey played a significant role in the New York art scene of the 1970s and 1980s.

Ranging thematically over several decades of the artist’s work, the exhibition includes early experiments with art and technology that mark a shift from object-based artistic practice to an experiential approach seeking to combine interactive performance with sculpture and video.  Along with this foundational early work, the exhibition also features Downey’s video installations of the 1970s and 1980s. These combine an autobiographical approach with the style of anthropological documentary—one of his most important contributions to the medium. In Downey’s later work, the intellectual and historical myths of European culture, as well as the roots of Latin American identity, are explored in complex video work that utilizes associative visual metaphors, collage-like techniques, and non-linear narrative.

In his two major series of works, Video Trans Americas and The Thinking Eye, Downey subjects the canonical and historical narratives of Western art to rich technical, visual, and intertextual analysis. In Video Trans Americas, begun in 1971, Downey anticipates much of the current interest in urbanism, post-colonial theory, and locality in contemporary artistic practice by mixing anthropology with autobiography. The Thinking Eye, a series made for public television, subjects the foundational concepts of Western culture—including the idea of the self—to linguistic, psychoanalytic, art historical, and semiotic interpretation, all through Downey’s mastery of video technology.

 

Presented in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect is organized by Valerie Smith, Curator at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. The exhibition will travel to the Arizona State University Art Museum, Tempe, AZ (September 24–December 31, 2011) and the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York (February 12–May 20, 2012).


All images: Juan Downey Estate, Courtesy of Marilys B. Downey

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2011 to 2013

smARTpowers, an initiative of the Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, administered by The Bronx Museum of the Arts, sends 15 U.S. artists abroad to work with local artists and young people around the world to create community-based art projects. Selected artists design and implement programs within a 45 day period in cooperation with local arts organizations in China, Ecuador, Egypt, Ghana, India, Kosovo, Lebanon, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Turkey, and Venezuela.

 

smARTpower artists are strongly encouraged to create a tangible legacy of the work, to remain in country, through a variety of visual arts media, including painting, sculpture, drawing, video, installation, photo-based work, public art, and interdisciplinary projects. Projects emphasize participatory work and address a full range of relevant subjects including, but not limited to, women's empowerment, the environment, health, education, and civic engagement.