Current

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February 17, 2017 to July 3, 2017

February 17, 2017 to July 3, 2017

 

Wild Noise/Ruido Salvaje is an exploration of contemporary Cuban art from the 1970s to the present that looks at how Cuban artists both on the island and abroad have grappled with issues of identity, community, and the urban experience. Bringing together over 60 works by more than 30 artists from the Bronx Museum collection and other U.S. institutions and private collections, the exhibition will feature many artworks that will be publicly exhibited for the first time.

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March 1, 2017 to June 11, 2017

March 1, 2017 to June 11, 2017

 

Love Thy Neighbor is the third and final part of The Neighbors, an exhibition series guest curated by Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy for The Bronx Museum of the Arts. In this third iteration of the series, “the neighbor” is characterized as the figure of the “Other,” that is, an entity viewed as distinctly foreign from the community, but who ultimately plays a role in the group. By centering on the representation of cultural difference, Love Thy Neighbor is meant to be an occasion for considering alterity, for how diversity sensibly builds society. The exhibition features new work by visual artists Firelei Baez, Ignacio González-Lang, and Irvin Morazan, with the intent of exploring the cultural processes of “othering.” 
 

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March 1, 2017 to July 3, 2017

March 1, 2017 to July 3, 2017

 

The seven-part painting Reflecting on the Familiar is Hauben’s attempt at capturing the sense of envelopment, enormity, and often, of the incomprehension that comes with living in the congested urban environment of The Bronx. Rather than depicting just a small portion of his expansive view, Hauben enlarges the scale to create a multi-faceted vision of the world around him.

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March 1, 2017 to June 25, 2017

March 1, 2017 to June 25, 2017

 

At the Bronx Museum’s Terrace, Arlene Slavin will present a group of sculptures from Intersections, a series that plays off the principle of the sundial. In these works, Slavin employs crisscrossed, translucent colored webs which remain stable, while the shadow created by the works is in perpetual change. In addition to the works on the Terrace, Slavin will also create a site-specific installation with colored films on the windows in the Museum’s Second Floor, producing a modern riff on stained glass.

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May 6, 2017 to November 2017

May 6, 2017 to November 2017

 

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance and the Bronx Museum of the Arts are pleased to present FLOW, an annual summer art exhibition located on Randall’s Island in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the history and ecology of the island through artistic expression. FLOW.17 will feature the Island of Empirical Data and Other Fabrications a series of site-specific installations conceived by Rose DeSiano, an alumna of the Bronx Museum's Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

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May 3, 2017 to May 29, 2017

May 3, 2017 to May 29, 2017

 

Organized by The Bronx Museum of the Arts Teen Council, this exhibition features artworks by New York City-based teen artists responding to the notion of time.

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June 16, 2016 - Ongoing

June 16, 2016 - Ongoing

 

Bronx Terminal Market, in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts, will showcase a new community mural inspired by scenic outdoor locations in the Bronx.

 

Upcoming

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November 8, 2017 to April 8, 2018

November 8, 2017 to April 8, 2018.

 

Best known for his monumental cuts, holes, apertures, and excisions to the facades of derelict homes and historic buildings in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, and abroad, Gordon Matta-Clark’s work conveys a potent critique of architecture's role vis-à-vis the capitalist system. Taking as a point of departure the pivotal series of “cuts” produced in the Bronx in the early 1970s that led to his further exploration of the city as a field of action, Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect will examine the artist’s pioneering social, relational, and activist approach. The exhibition highlights the political dialogue inherent in the artist’s artistic interventions—from his concern for the extreme plight of the homeless, his interest in direct community engagement, his belief that we should expand our lived experience of a city into its underground and other inaccessible spaces, and his commentary on development and socioeconomic stratification.

 

Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect includes over 100 artworks by the artist, rarely seen materials from his archive, and immersive film projections. On view beginning November 2017, Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect is organized by Antonio Sergio Bessa, Bronx Museum Director of Curatorial and Education Programs; and Jessamyn Fiore, independent curator and co-director of the Matta-Clark Estate. Following the Bronx Museum presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Jeu de Paume in Paris, France, and the Kumu Art Museum in Tallinn, Estonia.

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July 22, 2017 to October 22, 2017

July 22, 2017 to October 22, 2017

 

Now in its fourth cycle, Bronx Calling: The Fourth AIM Biennial features the work of seventy-two emerging artists from the 2016 and 2017 classes of the Bronx Museum’s Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) program. AIM provides professional development resources to emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. The exhibition is organized by Aylet Ojeda Jequin, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, National Museum of Fine Arts, Havana; and the Bronx Museum’s Christine Licata, Director of Community and Public Programs; and, Heather Reyes, Exhibitions and Collections Manager. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog.

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July 19, 2017 to October 22, 2017

July 19 - October 22, 2017

 

Heidi Lau’s practice centers on the recreation of histories that have been lost to time. Painstakingly built and glazed by hand, her ceramic work is modeled after ritual objects, columns, funereal monuments, and fossilized creatures, while simultaneously infesting, deconstructing, and rebuilding them on a cellular level. Lau uses symbolic artifacts and zoomorphic ruins as symbols of the archaic and the invisible, taking inspiration from colonial architecture and tenement houses in Macau that have mostly been demolished or gentrified beyond recognition. In the process, she continuously reenacts the non-linearity and materiality of the past, molding a tactile connection to the disappearing, impossible identity of home. Colonial history, folk Taoist mythology and provincial superstitions provide essential source material through which her work explores homelessness and nostalgia.

 

Lau’s terrace installation at Bronx Museum, The Primordial Molder, is a continuation of her large-scale ceramic sculpture series that ruminates on the Taoist creation myth: in the primordial world, Nüwa the Snake Goddess marked the beginning of humanity by patching a giant hole in heaven with five-colored stones, using the legs of a great turtle as pillars to support the collapsed sky from the earth. The Primordial Molder is the representation of Nüwa’s form as a snake that is both anthropomorphic and architectural. Its body curls and tangles around itself to form a ring – a symbol of eternal return and the infinite life cycle.

 

Heidi Lau grew up in Macau and currently works in Brooklyn. She has been features in exhibitions nationally and internationally in venues such as the Macao Museum of Art, Museum of Chinese in America, Wave Hill, Kniznick Gallery at Brandeis University and Real Art Ways. She has received numerous residencies and awards, including the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant, Emerging Artist Fellowship at Socrates Sculpture Park, Center for Book Arts Workspace Residency, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council Process Space and BRIC Media Arts Fellowship, among others. She completed the Bronx Museum’s Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) program in 2011.

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June 7, 2017 to October 22, 2017

fifty five years
my life in blood and panels
and brown gay ink

 

For the Bronx Museum's Community Gallery, Bronx-born Puerto Rican cartoonist Ivan Velez will exhibit a series of comics, drawings, and activist work spanning his renowned thirty-year career. 

Past

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July 19, 2012 - June 2, 2013

Does style define man? For centuries, style has been the focus of debate whether concerning writing, behavior or fashion. Around the late 1970s, the term “wild style” began to circulate among graffiti artists in the South Bronx to denote the kind of graphics involving complex, interlocking letters with aerodynamic forms. Coined by the legendary Tracy 168, the expression became associated with the rise of graffiti art in New York City, specifically in the Bronx, in the 1970s and that ultimately became a global movement. Started as an underground movement, the “wild style” is now part of the mainstream, studied as an art form and exhibited in museums all over the world. Bronx Lab—Style Wars features a number of works that reflect on that era to pose the question of what is today’s style.


Artists include Afrika Bambaataa, Henry Chalfant, Lady K Fever, Keith Haring, Dr. Lakra, Valerie Larko, Glendalys Medina, Johnny Perez, Tim Rollins and K.O.S., Rigoberto Torres, Tats Cru

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February 12, 2012 – June 11, 2012

The MIT List Visual Arts Center in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts presents the first United States museum survey of the work of Chilean-born video artist Juan Downey (1940–1993). Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect features a selection of key works by this under-recognized pioneer of video art. A fellow at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual studies in 1973 and 1975, Downey played a significant role in the New York art scene of the 1970s and 1980s.

Ranging thematically over several decades of the artist’s work, the exhibition includes early experiments with art and technology that mark a shift from object-based artistic practice to an experiential approach seeking to combine interactive performance with sculpture and video.  Along with this foundational early work, the exhibition also features Downey’s video installations of the 1970s and 1980s. These combine an autobiographical approach with the style of anthropological documentary—one of his most important contributions to the medium. In Downey’s later work, the intellectual and historical myths of European culture, as well as the roots of Latin American identity, are explored in complex video work that utilizes associative visual metaphors, collage-like techniques, and non-linear narrative.

In his two major series of works, Video Trans Americas and The Thinking Eye, Downey subjects the canonical and historical narratives of Western art to rich technical, visual, and intertextual analysis. In Video Trans Americas, begun in 1971, Downey anticipates much of the current interest in urbanism, post-colonial theory, and locality in contemporary artistic practice by mixing anthropology with autobiography. The Thinking Eye, a series made for public television, subjects the foundational concepts of Western culture—including the idea of the self—to linguistic, psychoanalytic, art historical, and semiotic interpretation, all through Downey’s mastery of video technology.

 

Presented in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect is organized by Valerie Smith, Curator at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. The exhibition will travel to the Arizona State University Art Museum, Tempe, AZ (September 24–December 31, 2011) and the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York (February 12–May 20, 2012).


All images: Juan Downey Estate, Courtesy of Marilys B. Downey

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2011 to 2013

smARTpowers, an initiative of the Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, administered by The Bronx Museum of the Arts, sends 15 U.S. artists abroad to work with local artists and young people around the world to create community-based art projects. Selected artists design and implement programs within a 45 day period in cooperation with local arts organizations in China, Ecuador, Egypt, Ghana, India, Kosovo, Lebanon, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Turkey, and Venezuela.

 

smARTpower artists are strongly encouraged to create a tangible legacy of the work, to remain in country, through a variety of visual arts media, including painting, sculpture, drawing, video, installation, photo-based work, public art, and interdisciplinary projects. Projects emphasize participatory work and address a full range of relevant subjects including, but not limited to, women's empowerment, the environment, health, education, and civic engagement.