Current

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May 8, 2019 to June 30, 2019

Organized by The Bronx Museum of the Arts Teen Council, Smells Like Teen Spirit features artwork created by New York City-based teen artists. Through an open call, young people were invited to submit artworks reflecting upon the experience of being a teenager today. From the submissions, Teen Council selected the artworks for their annual exhibition. 

 

 

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March 27, 2019 to September 1, 2019

It has been a long tradition among philosophers and writers to praise uselessness as a means to stress the importance of spiritual activities and creations without clear functional aims. Aristotle, for one, established early on that knowledge was valuable in itself, not for providing practical utility—a notion frequently forgotten today. To praise inutility, thus, has been a reaction to the materialistic values promoted by capitalist society, which has been criticized for its lack of moral and spiritual values. 

 

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March 6, 2019 to July 21, 2019

Widely regarded as a pioneer of video art, peter campus creates complex installations that engage and amuse, while leading the viewer in a journey of discovery and self-awareness. From the early closed-circuit video installations he began making in 1971 to the more recent work, campus’ entire oeuvre deals with processes of perception and vision, exploiting the specific characteristics of both the electronic and the digital image. His work provides a unique experience for the visitor, who activates the work while exploring their own image.

 

 

Upcoming

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August 7, 2019 to February 9, 2020

A quiet man who supported himself doing odd jobs such as street vendor, jewelry designer, photography printer, and cab driver, Bronx native Alvin Baltrop left an important body of work after his untimely death in 2004 that only now is garnering the serious attention it deserves. Like the startling images of Peter Moore, Robert Mapplethorpe, Peter Hujar, and Gordon Matta-Clark, the photographs of Alvin Baltrop memorialize New York City at a breaking-point moment amid ruin and chaos.

 

 

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June 6, 2019 to June 29, 2019

The Bronx Museum of the Arts is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new photographs by AIM artist-in-residence Pacifico Silano. 

Past

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July 19, 2012 - June 2, 2013

Does style define man? For centuries, style has been the focus of debate whether concerning writing, behavior or fashion. Around the late 1970s, the term “wild style” began to circulate among graffiti artists in the South Bronx to denote the kind of graphics involving complex, interlocking letters with aerodynamic forms. Coined by the legendary Tracy 168, the expression became associated with the rise of graffiti art in New York City, specifically in the Bronx, in the 1970s and that ultimately became a global movement. Started as an underground movement, the “wild style” is now part of the mainstream, studied as an art form and exhibited in museums all over the world. Bronx Lab—Style Wars features a number of works that reflect on that era to pose the question of what is today’s style.


Artists include Afrika Bambaataa, Henry Chalfant, Lady K Fever, Keith Haring, Dr. Lakra, Valerie Larko, Glendalys Medina, Johnny Perez, Tim Rollins and K.O.S., Rigoberto Torres, Tats Cru

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February 12, 2012 – June 11, 2012

The MIT List Visual Arts Center in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts presents the first United States museum survey of the work of Chilean-born video artist Juan Downey (1940–1993). Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect features a selection of key works by this under-recognized pioneer of video art. A fellow at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual studies in 1973 and 1975, Downey played a significant role in the New York art scene of the 1970s and 1980s.

Ranging thematically over several decades of the artist’s work, the exhibition includes early experiments with art and technology that mark a shift from object-based artistic practice to an experiential approach seeking to combine interactive performance with sculpture and video.  Along with this foundational early work, the exhibition also features Downey’s video installations of the 1970s and 1980s. These combine an autobiographical approach with the style of anthropological documentary—one of his most important contributions to the medium. In Downey’s later work, the intellectual and historical myths of European culture, as well as the roots of Latin American identity, are explored in complex video work that utilizes associative visual metaphors, collage-like techniques, and non-linear narrative.

In his two major series of works, Video Trans Americas and The Thinking Eye, Downey subjects the canonical and historical narratives of Western art to rich technical, visual, and intertextual analysis. In Video Trans Americas, begun in 1971, Downey anticipates much of the current interest in urbanism, post-colonial theory, and locality in contemporary artistic practice by mixing anthropology with autobiography. The Thinking Eye, a series made for public television, subjects the foundational concepts of Western culture—including the idea of the self—to linguistic, psychoanalytic, art historical, and semiotic interpretation, all through Downey’s mastery of video technology.

 

Presented in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect is organized by Valerie Smith, Curator at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. The exhibition will travel to the Arizona State University Art Museum, Tempe, AZ (September 24–December 31, 2011) and the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York (February 12–May 20, 2012).


All images: Juan Downey Estate, Courtesy of Marilys B. Downey

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2011 to 2013

smARTpowers, an initiative of the Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, administered by The Bronx Museum of the Arts, sends 15 U.S. artists abroad to work with local artists and young people around the world to create community-based art projects. Selected artists design and implement programs within a 45 day period in cooperation with local arts organizations in China, Ecuador, Egypt, Ghana, India, Kosovo, Lebanon, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Turkey, and Venezuela.

 

smARTpower artists are strongly encouraged to create a tangible legacy of the work, to remain in country, through a variety of visual arts media, including painting, sculpture, drawing, video, installation, photo-based work, public art, and interdisciplinary projects. Projects emphasize participatory work and address a full range of relevant subjects including, but not limited to, women's empowerment, the environment, health, education, and civic engagement.