Current

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Featuring Photographs by John Rowe

July 25, 2018 to November 4, 2018
 

Over the last fifty years, Cuban artist Manuel Mendive has developed a sophisticated and pointed examination of the influence of African oral-based traditions on Cuba through the experimental lens of contemporary art. His multidisciplinary work, in particular performances, has become a vehicle for exploring the intersections between art, religion, philosophy, politics, ethics, and anthropology. At the Bronx Museum, Mendive will present a new body of works focused on his continued visual interpretation of narratives of Yorùbá-Lucumí culture and wisdom literature, extending to the universal ideas and relationships between humans and nature.

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July 18, 2018 to October 14, 2018

July 18, 2018 to October 14, 2018

 

The Bronx Museum of the Arts is proud to present an exhibition of works by Diana Al-Hadid organized in collaboration with San José Museum of Art curator Lauren Schell Dickens. On view at the Bronx Museum from July 18 through October 14, 2018, the centerpiece of Diana Al-Hadid: Delirious Matter will be the monumental sculpture Nolli’s Orders (2012), inspired by Giambattista Nolli’s landmark 1748 map of Rome, the first of its kind to show the public spaces of the city.

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June 6, 2018 to September 23, 2018

June 6, 2018 to September 23, 2018

 

Photojournalist Randy H. Goodman captured life in the Islamic Republic of Iran during both the hostage crisis and the Iran-Iraq War. She returned in 2015, after thirty-three years, to photograph at yet another pivotal time in US - Iran relations — the signing of the Iran nuclear agreement. Her portraits and street scenes of WOMEN ONLY, from both periods, present a unique perspective on that country’s past and its future.

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April 18, 2018 to September 16, 2018

April 18, 2018 to September 16, 2018

 

Landing / Aterrizaje is solo show of Bronx artist Moses Ros’ sculptures on the Bronx Museum’s Sculpture Terrace. The work is inspired by recent migrations to the United States caused by environmental and manmade disasters and catastrophes that have wrenched people away from their homelands. In this series, Ros focuses on the Caribbean experience, creating large, freestanding sculptures based on a main staple and export of the islands, the platano (plantain banana).  Using cut-out, plywood sheets to form a type of DIY “assembly kit” of the work, the large-scale, painted winged forms, along with the post-cut template panels that once held them are juxtaposed within the space. 

Upcoming

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November 14, 2018 to February 17, 2019

Widely recognized for his large scale paintings that incorporate silkscreens of blown up
drawings, Eddie Martinez has built a consistent body of work over the last decade
successfully merging the tradition of American abstract painting with the energy of the
street. In this new body of work, created especially for this exhibition, Martinez
introduces yet a new element to his process in the guise of whiting out parts of the
composition, a move that represents a significant point in his career.

Erasure has been an important practice since the origins of art, and x-rays of paintings
by old masters often reveal ghostly images underneath. What might have started out of
necessity, however, eventually became an effect often referred to as pentimento, and in
1953 it became a celebrated trope when Robert Rauschenberg transformed a drawing
by Willem de Kooning by blurring its lines.

For many artists, the very idea of whiting out or erasing presents a daunting challenge as
it comes enmeshed in connotations of destruction. That is not the case for Martinez,
who regards the act of removing or obliterating painted elements not as an end in itself,
but as an integral part of the process of constructing a painting. He is aware of how
reductive the process of building an image can be—whether abstractly in our brain, or
physically in the studio. Martinez is inspired by the shapes and compositions formed on
walls that have been painted over with mismatched hues that seem to take on a life and
form of their own. The process in his studio follows a similar process, as he is
continuously looking for those points of resistance in the work to inform them and guide
them forward.

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November 7, 2018 to March 3, 2019

The work of Bronx native Rochelle Feinstein is deeply informed by abstraction, while also conveying a keen sensibility to contemporary culture, particularly to our everyday use of language. Over the span of the last four decades, Feinstein has probed the relevance of the abstract painting tradition vis-a-vis a rapidly changing cultural environment. She has used the lexicon of abstract painting to approach subjects of both personal and social import such as the televised police pursuit of OJ Simpson (El Bronco, 1994); the Iraq war (Hotspots, 2003 - ongoing), and the economic downturn of 2008 (The Estate of Rochelle F., 2010)

 

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October 3, 2018 to January 6, 2019

What happens when an artist disengages, psychically if not ideologically, from the margins? Can those in the mainstream responsibly acknowledge and harness their status toward progressive art in the US and elsewhere? These pressing questions inform the narrative structure of  the installation Aloha to the World at the Don Ho Terrace, an imagined meandering to and from Hong Kong (and possibly back in time) from where Christopher K. Ho emigrated at age four. This solo exhibition, which includes a 35-foot tall banner, artifacts from a defunct Hawaiian hotel co-owned by Ho’s grandfather, and signage mimicking the hotel’s grand entrance, grapples with reverse diaspora’s aspirations, and, particularly, the affective shift from being an ethnic minor in the United States to rejoining the Han majority. 


Christopher K. Ho (b. Hong Kong, 1974) is a speculative artist based in New York, Hong Kong, and Telluride, Colorado, whose practice includes object-making, organizing, writing, and teaching. His multi-component projects address privilege, community, and capital, and draw equally from learned material about, and lived encounters with, power and otherness in an unevenly de-colonialized, increasingly networked world. He has exhibited at Storm King Art Center, the Queens Museum, Cranbrook Art Museum, Para Site, MASS MoCA, and Socrates Sculpture Park, among other venues. He was included in the Incheon Biennial, the Chinese Biennial Beijing, and the Busan Biennial, and is currently working on a solo project for the Brooklyn Academy of Music. He received his BFA and BS from Cornell University and his MPhil from Columbia University.

Past

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November 4, 2015 to March 13, 2016

November 4, 2015 to March 13, 2016

 

Martin Wong: Human Instamatic will be the first museum retrospective of the work of Chinese-American painter Martin Wong (1946-1999) since his untimely death. The exhibition will offer the first in-depth assessment of Wong’s formal contributions as a painter, placing his work in line with such 20th-century painters as Marsden Hartley and Alice Neel, both renowned for their insightful portraits of the communities in which they lived. Co-curated by Sergio Bessa and Yasmin Ramírez, the exhibition will feature over 90 of Wong’s paintings with rarely-seen archival materials from the Martin Wong Papers at the Fales Library of New York University.

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Artworks from the Permanent Collection
October 24, 2015 to January 17, 2016

October 24, 2015 to January 17, 2016

 

The exhibition reflects on the legacy of constructivist art as reinterpreted by contemporary  artists. Featuring works by Vito Acconci, Joseph Albers, Paul Chan, Marcelo Cidade, Glenn Goldberg, Mary Heilmann, Elizabeth Jobim, Jarbas Lopes, Dennis Oppenheim, and Liliana Porter. In addition, a group of chairs by Mary Heilmann especially commissioned by the Whitney Museum suggests the connection between art and design.

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October 15, 2015 to February 14, 2016

October 15, 2015 to February 14, 2016

 

The Bangladeshi American Creative Collective (BACC) is proud to present Transitions: New Photography from Bangladesh. With the rise of factories, investors, and development, the landscape of Bangladesh is changing. This exhibition will feature nine Bangladeshi photographers whose work reflects a diverse group of people, shifting economies, and changing lands. Its aim is to not only to collect and exhibit photography as art; but also as ideas about the country of Bangladesh.

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September 26, 2015 to February 14, 2016

September 26, 2015 to February 14, 2016

 

Trees Are Alphabets considers how the sun, rain, wind, and soil constantly transform the shapes of trees since evolving in primeval forests. Artist E. J. McAdams sees in these transformations a vision of an epiphenomenon – like a text – that is forever changing. For the duration of the exhibition, McAdams will write with tree branches, in the hope to make space for a resonant poetic emanation to emerge out of this human-tree collaboration.

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The Third AIM Biennial
July 9 to September 20, 2015

July 9 to September 20, 2015

 

Curated by Bronx-based artists Hatuey Ramos-Fermín and Laura Napier, Bronx Calling: The Third AIM Biennial features the work of seventy-two emerging artists engaged in the Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) Program (classes of 2014 and 2015). AIM provides professional development opportunities for emerging artists residing and working in the New York metropolitan area. 

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July 2 to October 18, 2015

July 2 to October 18, 2015

 

Organized by guest curators Johanna Fernández and Yasmín Ramírez, ¡Presente! The Young Lords in New York was the first museum survey to examine the radical social group founded by Puerto Rican youth in New York and Chicago in the 1960s. The Young Lords’ impactful political activities, community-focused initiatives, and spirited affirmation of Puerto Rican identity inspired both a generation of artists active during this era and artists working today. 

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Outdoor Art on Randall's Island
May 30 to November 2015

May 30 to November 2015

 

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance, the Bronx Museum of the Arts and Made Event are pleased to present FLOW annual summer art exhibitions along the shoreline at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the shoreline through artistic expression, while calling visitors to interact with and care for the Park’s island environment. Each year, FLOW features site specific projects by participants in the Bronx Museum’s Artists in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

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May 28 to June 14, 2015

May 28 to June 14, 2015

 

An exhibition of teen artwork curated by The Bronx Museum Teen Council: "As millennials we grew up under the influence of video games; they taught us all about secrets and boundaries. They showed us that secrets make the game interesting, and we learned how to destroy and build boundaries in order to access those secrets. Secrets and boundaries are significant because they make us human. In a world without secrets and boundaries, we would be unable to distinguish between our inner and outer selves. This exhibition showcases artwork that explores these themes alongside works from the museum's permanent collection."

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May 21 to July 12, 2015 at El Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes

May 21 to July 12, 2015

 

The Bronx Museum of the Arts and El Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de La Habana (MNBA) have announced an unprecedented joint arts initiative that is the culmination of years of planning and collaboration. Wild Noise: Artwork from The Bronx Museum of the Arts and El Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes represents the most extensive visual arts exchange between the two countries in more than 50 years, and will include major exhibitions at MNBA and the Bronx Museum; an artist exchange with U.S. artist Mary Mattingly and Cuban artist Humberto Diaz; a teen exchange program; a series of educational and public programs; and the publication of a dual-language publication that will extend the impact of Wild Noise beyond the audiences that participate directly in the initiative.

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March 29 to June 14, 2015

March 29 to June 14, 2015

 

The selection of works presented in Jaime Davidovich: Adventures of the Avant-Garde charts the artist’s transit through different iterations of the avant-garde; from an early exploration in the monochrome’s possibilities and spatial concerns that would also later inform his site-specific works of the late sixties and early seventies, to the video works of the of the same period up until the 1990s, which not only pioneered the use of television as a medium but also addressed themes such as identity, diaspora and globalization.

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March 26 to June 21, 2015

March 26 to June 21, 2015

 

Featuring three new works, the terrace installation Please Touch conveys artist Raul Mourão's awareness of the city, with its characters, architecture, objects and accidents. Displaced from their original sites and stripped of any function, mundane street elements are further altered in shape and scale by the artist. With its humorous nods to constructive and conceptual art, Please Touch entails active contemplation from the spectator, in that it extends familiar objects into the arena of the nonsensical.
 

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Works from the Shelley and Donald Rubin Private Collection
March 19 to June 21, 2015

March 19 to June 21, 2015

 

The recent announcement of a new re-engagement policy between the United States and Cuba has increased the level of expectation as to what the future of the island will be. While this new political openness will undoubtedly attract new markets and an influx of foreign investment, truly creative solutions for the local communities and their diverse culture will have to come from within.  By featuring a selection of works from the Shelley and Donald Rubin Private Collection, the exhibition Cuba Libre! suggests that contemporary Cuban artists have already been engaged in this discussion, providing thoughtful materials for their audiences to ponder on their diversity and rich historical legacy.

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Jules Aarons, Morton Broffman, and Joe Conzo
February 26 to June 14, 2015

February 26 to June 14, 2015

 

Three Photographers from the Bronx showcases work by three Bronx-born photographers who captured significant moments of societal and urban change in the borough and across the country during a period marked by important social, cultural and political transformations. The exhibition features over 80 works, from depictions of daily life in the Bronx and Far Rockaways in the early 1950s, to images of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, to a searing look at Bronx community protests in the early 1980s. Together these works create an exchange across three distinct and intertwined moments, exploring the legacy of community activism and urban change and launching a dialogue surrounding the challenges the Bronx and similar communities continue to face today.

 

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February 12 to May 31, 2015
February 12 to May 31, 2015
 
Escape Route: Paintings and Drawings by Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave will present a selection of works by the New York based artist created from 2011 to 2014 that deal with issues related to race, religion and sexuality. Since 1998 Hargrave has produced a compelling, deeply personal body of work incorporating painting, drawing, sculpture and video that explore the dynamics between race, sexuality and religion in relation to his upbringing in the south and early adulthood as an African American gay male coming to terms with racial and sexual identity.
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January 29 to June 28, 2015

January 29 to June 28, 2015

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from the Arachnae Series by Aristides Logothetis
January 15 to April 12, 2015

Craft And Colony: from the Arachnae Series by Aristides Logothetis presents a new large sculpture by New York-based artist Aristides Logothetis created in 2014 that deals with issues related to the many ways visual signs are coded through culture, and then used as support of systems, constructs, and power hierarchies. Since the 1990’s Logothetis has produced a diverse body of work incorporating sculpture, painting, photography, collage, and installation that explore visual perception and its relationship to a reordered, very personal combination of formalism, narrative, process, and metaphor.