Current

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April 25, 2018 to July 1, 2018

April 25, 2018 to July 1, 2018

 

Oded Halahmy: Exile is Home includes over 100 works representing Halahmy’s work from the mid-1960s to the present and features a selection of Judaica – handmade by the artist for Hanukkah and Sukkah celebrations with close friends. Halahmy currently lives and works in New York and Old Jaffa, Israel. His work has been included in numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout the United States, Europe and the Middle East. 

 

Oded Halahmy: Exile is Home is organized by guest curator: Margaret Mathews-Berenson, and made possible by the lead sponsorship of an anonymous patron and the additional support of the Bronx Museum’s Director’s Circle.

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April 18, 2018 to September 19, 2018

April 18, 2018 to September 19, 2018

 

Landing / Aterrizaje is solo show of Bronx artist Moses Ros’ sculptures on the Bronx Museum’s Sculpture Terrace. The work is inspired by recent migrations to the United States caused by environmental and manmade disasters and catastrophes that have wrenched people away from their homelands. In this series, Ros focuses on the Caribbean experience, creating large, freestanding sculptures based on a main staple and export of the islands, the platano (plantain banana).  Using cut-out, plywood sheets to form a type of DIY “assembly kit” of the work, the large-scale, painted winged forms, along with the post-cut template panels that once held them are juxtaposed within the space. 

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October 25, 2017 to April 29, 2018

October 27, 2017 to April 29, 2018

 

The Bronx Museum of the Arts is proud to present an exhibition focusing on a series of new paintings by Angel Otero. On view at the Bronx Museum from October 25, 2017 through April 29, 2018, this exhibition will highlight Otero’s commitment to making paintings and sculptures that mine and celebrate key examples of the art of the past. Angel Otero: Elegies is organized by guest curator Christian Viveros-Fauné.

Upcoming

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November 7, 2018 to March 3, 2019

The work of Bronx native Rochelle Feinstein is deeply informed by abstraction, while also conveying a keen sensibility to contemporary culture, particularly to our everyday use of language. Over the span of the last four decades, Feinstein has probed the relevance of the abstract painting tradition vis-a-vis a rapidly changing cultural environment. She has used the lexicon of abstract painting to approach subjects of both personal and social import such as the televised police pursuit of OJ Simpson (El Bronco, 1994); the Iraq war (Hotspots, 2003 - ongoing), and the economic downturn of 2008 (The Estate of Rochelle F., 2010)

 

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Featuring photographs and videos by John Rowe

Over the last fifty years, Cuban artist Manuel Mendive has developed a highly personal examination of the African spiritual tradition of Yoruba through the experimental lens of contemporary art. The artist’s multidisciplinary work, in particular his performances, has become a vehicle for exploring the intersections between art, religion, philosophy, ethics, and anthropology. At the Bronx Museum, Mendive will present a new body of works focused on his continued interest in Yoruba mythology, pondering on man’s relationship with nature and spirituality. Conceptualized as a cohesive group of paintings and sculptures, the overall installation suggests an “ancestral tour” to the heart of nature. Steeped in religious and philosophical ideas, Mendive’s artworks invite the viewer to immerse in a mythical search for identity. The exhibition will also feature a new performance in September 2017 created by Mendive specifically for the Bronx Museum.

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July 18, 2018 to October 14, 2018

The Bronx Museum of the Arts is proud to present an exhibition of works by Diana Al-Hadid organized in collaboration with San José Museum of Art curator Lauren Schell Dicken. On view at the Bronx Museum from May 23 through October 14, 2018, the centerpiece of Diana Al-Hadid: Delirious Matter will be the monumental sculpture Nolli’s Orders (2012), inspired by Giambattista Nolli’s landmark 1748 map of Rome, the first of its kind to show the public spaces of the city.

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June 6, 2018 to September 23, 2018

Photojournalist Randy H. Goodman captured life in the Islamic Republic of Iran during both the
hostage crisis and the Iran-Iraq War. She returned in 2015, after thirty-three years, to
photograph at yet another pivotal time in US - Iran relations — the signing of the Iran nuclear
agreement. Her portraits and street scenes of WOMEN ONLY, from both periods, present a
unique perspective on that country’s past and its future.

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May 16, 2018 to July 15, 2018

This exhibition in honor of the late Tim Rollins takes as its departure point the concept of dialog that was central to his vision as an artist and educator. Deeply influenced by the educational theories of Brazilian philosopher Paulo Freire, Rollins used dialog to bring out the truth in each pupil, harmonizing different voices in their varied nuances. Working as a Public School teacher in the South Bronx starting in 1981, his educational approach was pivotal in infusing a sense of pride and belonging among students that often felt alienated from the mainstream. Famously, his call to arms was: “Do you want to make history?” Those who would respond to his call would invariably become masters of their own narrative. For Rollins, the idea of dialog was also an integral part of his art practice, and we might consider the whole of his collaboration with K.O.S. as a sustained dialog not only among members of the group, but most importantly, with great interlocutors of the past, like W.E.B. DuBois, Martin Luther King, George Orwell, and Franz Kafka to mention but a few.

 

Dialoguing with noted precursors is also essential to Glenn Ligon’s practice, whose work often borrows from noted African American visionaries like James Baldwin, Zora Neale Hurston, and Ralph Ellison. Like Rollins, Ligon is perceptive to the power of words, and to how they can elevate or stigmatize individuals. Born in the Bronx in 1960, he belongs to a generation of Black intellectuals that furthered the revolutionary ideas sowed by leader of the Civil Rights movement in the previous decades.

 

This exhibition invites the viewer to explore parallels between the approaches of Tim Rollins & K.O.S. and of Glenn Ligon, and identify their distinct traits. For although the practice of borrowing from different literary sources is at the very basis of their practices, they ultimately arrive at different results. While the works of Rollins & K.O.S. often strike an elegiac tone, Ligon seems rather intent on speaking through the language of others. A case in point is how the topic of slavery is dealt differently in works such as Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl (1997), and the series of lithographs Runaways (1993). Form, however, often works as an equalizer and we find a surprising echo between Ligon’s reworking of a poster used during the sanitation workers assembly in Memphis in 1968 (I AM A MAN), and Rollins & K.O.S.’ homage to Ralph Ellison’s The Invisible Man (2008).


Dialogues: Tim Rollins & K.O.S. and Glenn Ligon has been organized by Antonio Sergio Bessa and Rick Savinon.

Past

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South Bronx Waterfront Sagas
November 2, 2016 to February 19, 2017

Linda Cunningham explores the issues of time, transience, and contradictions through images of the shifting urban present. Environmental concerns juxtaposed against industry, urban blight, and the loss of the natural environment drive her practice, in addition to gentrification and the changing landscape of the Bronx, her home for many years. 

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November 2, 2016 – January 1, 2017

As a participant of the 1980s generation of artists that came of out of the Instituto Superior de Art (ISA), in Havana, Quisqueya Henriquez was deeply influenced by the conceptual and experimental pedagogical model promoted by ISA at the time. With a career spanning over twenty years, Henriquez has carefully built a coherent body of work that sustains a critical dialogue with international currents while also sharply tuned to Caribbean contemporary life and culture. Henriquez’s first mid-career survey was organized by the Bronx Museum in 2007.

 

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October 12, 2016 to February 12, 2017
The Neighbors, part two, in two parts: Sanctuary: Andrea Bowers and Home: Andrea Aragón establishes a dialogue on immigration through the work of American artist Andrea Bowers and Guatemalan photographer Andrea Aragón. This is the second iteration in the exhibition series The Neighbors, which addresses issues surrounding cultural uprooting and belonging, as well as social mobility and political resistance. 
 
 
 
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Symposium
September 15, 2016 to February 19, 2017

September 15, 2016 to February 19, 2017

 

Robert Raphael’s ceramic-based work draws on the complex history of decorative art, a tradition that intersects and runs parallel to the history of art. Rather than interpreting ornamentation as superficial, Raphael believes that the strength of decoration lies in its seductive nature and the complex meanings that often result when surface, mass, pattern, and cultural history conflate.

 

For the installation at The Bronx Museum of the Arts Raphael’s work focuses on classical ornamentation and its prevalence from historical time through to contemporary society. 

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July 13 to October 23, 2016

July 13 to October 23, 2016

 

This summer The Bronx Museum of the Arts will present Art AIDS America, the first exhibition to examine the deep and ongoing influence of the AIDS crisis on American art and culture. The exhibition will feature more than 125 works in a wide range of media dating from 1981 to the present day, by artists including Félix González-Torres, Derek Jackson, Kia Labeija, Annie Leibovitz, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Martin Wong. The exhibition, on view from July 13 through October 23,2016,  is organized by the Tacoma Art Museum in partnership with The Bronx Museum of the Arts.

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July 13 to October 23, 2016

 

In 2007, the Museum of Modern Art exhibited a series of drawings by French post-Impressionist painter and draftsman Georges Seurat. Frank Gimpaya was taken by the painter’s 1882 rendering of The Veil.  He was inspired to create a photographic tableau of this drawing as a means of instruction for the photography classes he taught at Saint Peter's University in Jersey City, New Jersey.

 
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July 13 to September 25, 2016

July 13 to September 25, 2016

 

Caza: Rochele Gomez, Margaret Lee, Alejandra Seeber is part of The Neighbors, a series of three small-scale, successive exhibitions of contemporary art organized by guest curator Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy for The Bronx Museum of the Arts. 

 

What would it mean to tame art? And, what or whom would this taming of art serve? The group exhibition Caza—a word that in Spanish means “searching” or “hunting,” and is a homophone of “casa” (home)—is an attempt to respond to such questions, or an occasion to at least consider them. 

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Organized by the Tampa Museum of Art in collaboration with the Bronx Museum of the Arts
October 8, 2016 to February 5, 2017

On view at the Tampa Museum of Art.

 

Complicated Beauty, a survey exhibition of contemporary Cuban art from the 1970s to the present, will be the first of several Cuban art exhibitions at the Museum. Inspired by historic connections between Tampa and Havana, as well as the recent reopening of relations between the US and Cuba, Complicated Beauty will highlight several recent acquisitions to the Tampa Museum of Art’s permanent collection, including Simply Beautiful by Mabel Poblet and Cada Sonido es una Forma del Tiempo (Every Sound is a Shape of Time) by Glenda León. Alongside these and other artworks from the Tampa collection, the exhibition will also include numerous loaned artworks from the collections of the Bronx Museum of the Arts and several private collections.

 

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April 6 to May 30, 2016

April 6 to May 30, 2016

 

Focusing initially on artists of African, Asian and Latin American descent, the Bronx Museum Permanent Collection was created in 1986 with the goal to reflect the borough's dynamic communities. Beyond The Veil focuses on an eclectic group of contemporary artists in the Permanent Collection whose works convey the complex mediation between the self and the other, between one’s allegiance to tradition and the appeal of globalism.

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Spotlight: John Ahearn and Rigoberto Torres

 

This exhibition highlights a group of sculptures by John Ahearn and Rigoberto Torres in the Bronx Museum Permanent Collection. Whether produced individually or in collaboration, this series of works convey both artists’ commitment to representing their local communities. John Ahearn moved from downtown Manhattan to the South Bronx in 1979 and began making his first casts of local residents at Fashion Moda, an alternative gallery that thrived in the South Bronx during the 1980s and early 1990s. It was during one of these live casting sessions that Rigoberto Torres met Ahearn. As it happened, Torres had already been introduced to casting and painting at his uncle’s statuary factory. At first, Torres volunteered as a model and later became Ahearn’s long-time collaborator. Over the span of a 30-year career, Ahearn and Torres have exhibited their work widely across the United States, Europe, and Latin America.  

 

In addition to works previously collected by the Bronx Museum, the present exhibition also includes a suite of busts recently donated by Krasdale Foods, Inc. that were originally exhibited at their Community Gallery in the early 1980s. Transforming the everyday man, woman, and child into monumental works of art, these casts evidence the trust and respect that both Ahearn and Torres established with South Bronx residents. 

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March 2 to May 29, 2016

March 2 to May 29, 2016

 

Since 2007 Michele Brody has been serving tea to the public through the interactive community-based project Reflections in Tea.  The ritual performance of preparing loose-leaf tea within special paper filters is shared with individuals and groups. The participants’ conversations are then preserved by being transcribed onto the stained tea bags that have been dried and flattened, culminating in the creation of an ever-growing set of fluttering paper quilts. Through the experience of reading participants’ stories, Reflections in Tea reflects back to the public both a visual and visceral experience of their collective memories and experiences.

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February 24 to May 8, 2016

February 24 to May 8, 2016

 

Since the mid-1990s, Jill Baroff has been strongly influenced by Japanese architecture, which she categorizes as “floor-based,” as opposed to the West’s emphasis on verticality. During a six-month NEA fellowship in Japan, Baroff was captivated by the way light traveled across the weave of her tatami floor during the day; constantly changing the patterns of the mats and consequently affecting the shape and feel of the interior spaces she occupied. In 1997, for an exhibition in Germany, Baroff achieved the same kind of effect using corrugated paper. For the installation at the Bronx Museum Terrace, Baroff chose to work with tree trunks collected from a grove in Upstate New York.

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February 3 to June 26, 2016

February 3 to June 26, 2016

 

Widely recognized as one of the very few female pioneers of Land Art, artist Michelle Stuart is known for her nature-based art dating to the late 1960s and 1970s. Comparatively lesser-known are her remarkable photographic works, which constitute a crucial part of her oeuvre and have been her primary focus over the past several years.

 

Organized by guest curator Gregory Volk, the exhibition consists of twelve recent large-scale works—including a major wall piece created specifically for this exhibition—as well as two important pieces from the early 1980s that can be seen as precursors to Stuart’s later direction.  This exhibition is the first museum treatment of Stuart’s photography-based works.

 

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April 6 to June 26, 2016

April 6 to June 26, 2016

 

The South Bronx Trades series, initiated in 2011 and still in progress, documents the active industries and manufacturing enterprises of Port Morris and Hunts Point, revealing to the viewer the unseen places and unheralded workers of the South Bronx. In contrast with the grim imagery often associated with the South Bronx, Fougeron’s photographs show us that industry persists and thrives in the borough. 

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April 6 to June 26, 2016

April 6 to June 26, 2016

 

The works in Bronx Focus: Paintings by Valeri Larko serve as a record of the vibrant graffiti culture as displayed in structures throughout the borough now, and on the verge of extinction. Larko’s paintings remind viewers of a Bronx that coexists as both a city and nature reserve, capable of gritty and touching beauty, while also focusing on themes of memory, preservation, and expansion.