Current

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June 23, 2021 – October 24, 2021

Amerika. God Bless You If It’s Good To You is an exhibition of flat works and performance collaborations of twelve new and recent drawings and mixed media collages by Harlem-based artist Wardell Milan. Split into two parts, the exhibition explores the undergirding of contemporary America. The first portion of the exhibition, comprising new works on paper, explores the insidious normalcy of White supremacy in America. At the heart of the exhibition is the question: “What do terrorists do when they’re not terrorizing?” This inquiry pushes the artist’s assertion that racial violence is interwoven into the fabric of American life, and is an indiscriminate presence in public and private realms––from the Bayou to the Bronx. The second section of the show, which is housed in a site-specific chapel structure, designed by Billy Ray Morgan, explores the idea of “Safe Space” for communities that have been historically oppressed. This chapel space, modeled after the Rothko Chapel, will set the stage for a series of collaborative performances, choreographed by Milan and Zachary Tye Richardson, and unpack the need for safety interlinked through histories of violence; to be affirmed and celebrated. Within this chapel, these irrepressible bodies cannot be flattened but must be reckoned with. 

 

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April 28, 2021 - September 26, 2021 (extended)

Born in Flames: Feminist Futures is a constellation of imagined world-scapes projected by fourteen contemporary artists. Set within the space of an exhibition, the artwork presented is a projection of the artists’ larger visions about futurity. Each section of the show is a microcosmic speculation on what could have been, what is, or what is to come. These worlds are steeped in lessons of our complicated pasts, peppered with the ravages of oppression but also blooming joys. Their work critically examines current struggles for equity by exploring strategies for justice and equality through multifaceted futurisms. 

 

Born in Flames: Feminist Futures (Nacer En Llamas: Futuros Feministas) es una constelación de mundos-paisajes imaginados en las proyecciones de quince artistas contemporáneas. Enmarcado en el espacio de una exhibición, las obras son una proyección de las visiones ampliadas de lxs artistas acerca de la futuridad. Cada sección de la muestra es una especulación micro cósmica de lo que podría haber sido, lo que es, y lo que está por venir.  Estos mundos están impregnados de las lecciones de nuestros complicados pasados, salpicados de los estragos de la opresión, pero también de las alegrías florecientes. Sus obras examinan críticamente las luchas actuales por la equidad a través de la exploración de estrategias para la justicia y la equidad a través de futurismos multifacéticas. 

 

Upcoming

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November 10, 2021 - March 20, 2022

From November 10, 2021, to March 20, 2022, the Bronx Museum will present Bronx Calling: The Fifth AIM Biennial showcasing the work of 68 early career artists from the 2018 and 2019 cycles of the Bronx Museum’s AIM Fellowship program. Co-organized by Ian Cofre (Director, PS 122 Gallery) and Eva Mayhabal Davis (Co-Director, Transmitter), the fifth edition of Bronx Calling considers the multiple crises of health, grief, the environment, and identity that define our contemporary moment.

Past

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September 25, 2019 to March 8, 2020

Widely regarded as one of the most significant documentarians of street art, Henry Chalfant has produced a voluminous body documenting the emergence of the trend since its early days in the Bronx, following its transformation into the international phenomenon it is today. Chalfant’s photographs are a work of visual anthropology and one of the seminal documents of American popular culture in the late twentieth century. 

 

 

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August 7, 2019 to February 9, 2020

A quiet man who supported himself doing odd jobs such as street vendor, jewelry designer, photography printer, and cab driver, Bronx native Alvin Baltrop left an important body of work after his untimely death in 2004 that only now is garnering the serious attention it deserves. Like the startling images of Peter Moore, Robert Mapplethorpe, Peter Hujar, and Gordon Matta-Clark, the photographs of Alvin Baltrop memorialize New York City at a breaking-point moment amid ruin and chaos.

 

 

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This program features a collection of documentary videos created by participants in The Bronx Museum’s Teen Council and Teen Summer programs. For over 14 years participants in these programs have interviewed artists, activists, and other community anchors to learn how they contribute to the richness of arts and culture in the Bronx and beyond. Through this process teens develop deep, career-enhancing skills and begin to see themselves as agents of change in their immediate communities and the wider world. 

 

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June 6, 2019 to June 29, 2019

The Bronx Museum of the Arts is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new photographs by AIM artist-in-residence Pacifico Silano that explore the vestiges of loss felt across the LGBTQ community owing to the 1980s AIDS crisis. The exhibition is presented in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising.

 

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May 8, 2019 to June 30, 2019

Organized by The Bronx Museum of the Arts Teen Council, Smells Like Teen Spirit features artwork created by New York City-based teen artists. Through an open call, young people were invited to submit artworks reflecting upon the experience of being a teenager today. From the submissions, Teen Council selected the artworks for their annual exhibition. 

 

 

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April 25, 2019 to May 18, 2019

 

My Home Has Wings / Mi Casa Tiene Alas features a selection of recent work on mobility and migration by AIM artist-in-residence Blanka Amezkua made in collaboration with Rene Mendoza.

 

My Home Has Wings is presented at The Bronx Museum's satellite project space, The Block Gallery, located in Lower Manhattan.

 

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March 27, 2019 to September 1, 2019

It has been a long tradition among philosophers and writers to praise uselessness as a means to stress the importance of spiritual activities and creations without clear functional aims. Aristotle, for one, established early on that knowledge was valuable in itself, not for providing practical utility—a notion frequently forgotten today. To praise inutility, thus, has been a reaction to the materialistic values promoted by capitalist society, which has been criticized for its lack of moral and spiritual values. 

 

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March 6, 2019 to July 21, 2019

Widely regarded as a pioneer of video art, peter campus creates complex installations that engage and amuse, while leading the viewer in a journey of discovery and self-awareness. From the early closed-circuit video installations he began making in 1971 to the more recent work, campus’ entire oeuvre deals with processes of perception and vision, exploiting the specific characteristics of both the electronic and the digital image. His work provides a unique experience for the visitor, who activates the work while exploring their own image.