Current

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July 22, 2017 to October 22, 2017

July 22, 2017 to October 22, 2017

 

Now in its fourth cycle, Bronx Calling: The Fourth AIM Biennial features the work of seventy-two emerging artists from the 2016 and 2017 classes of the Bronx Museum’s Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) program. AIM provides professional development resources to emerging artists living and working in the New York metropolitan area. The exhibition is organized by Aylet Ojeda Jequin, Associate Curator of Contemporary Art, National Museum of Fine Arts, Havana; and the Bronx Museum’s Christine Licata, Director of Community and Public Programs; and, Heather Reyes, independent curator.

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July 19, 2017 to October 22, 2017

July 19 - October 22, 2017

 

Heidi Lau’s practice centers on the recreation of histories that have been lost to time. Colonial history, folk Taoist mythology and provincial superstitions provide essential source material through which her work explores homelessness and nostalgia. Painstakingly crafted and glazed by hand, her ceramic work is modeled after ritual objects, columns, funereal monuments, and fossilized creatures, while simultaneously deconstructing, and rebuilding these models into new hybrid forms.

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June 7, 2017 to October 22, 2017

June 7, 2017 to October 22, 2017

 

fifty five years
my life in blood and panels
and brown gay ink

 

Bronx-born Puerto Rican cartoonist and educator Ivan Velez exhibits a series of drawings related to comics, as well as his activist work spanning his thirty-year career. 

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May 6, 2017 to November 2017

May 6, 2017 to November 2017

 

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance and the Bronx Museum of the Arts are pleased to present FLOW, an annual summer art exhibition located on Randall’s Island in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the history and ecology of the island through artistic expression. FLOW.17 will feature the Island of Empirical Data and Other Fabrications a series of site-specific installations conceived by Rose DeSiano, an alumna of the Bronx Museum's Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

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June 16, 2016 - Ongoing

June 16, 2016 - Ongoing

 

Bronx Terminal Market, in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts, will showcase a new community mural inspired by scenic outdoor locations in the Bronx.

 

Upcoming

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November 8, 2017 to April 8, 2018

November 8, 2017 to April 8, 2018.

 

Best known for his monumental cuts, holes, apertures, and excisions to the facades of derelict homes and historic buildings in New York, New Jersey, Chicago, and abroad, Gordon Matta-Clark’s work conveys a potent critique of architecture's role vis-à-vis the capitalist system. Taking as a point of departure the pivotal series of “cuts” produced in the Bronx in the early 1970s that led to his further exploration of the city as a field of action, Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect will examine the artist’s pioneering social, relational, and activist approach. The exhibition highlights the political dialogue inherent in the artist’s artistic interventions—from his concern for the extreme plight of the homeless, his interest in direct community engagement, his belief that we should expand our lived experience of a city into its underground and other inaccessible spaces, and his commentary on development and socioeconomic stratification.

 

Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect includes over 100 artworks by the artist, rarely seen materials from his archive, and immersive film projections. On view beginning November 2017, Gordon Matta-Clark: Anarchitect is organized by Antonio Sergio Bessa, Bronx Museum Director of Curatorial and Education Programs; and Jessamyn Fiore, independent curator and co-director of the Matta-Clark Estate. Following the Bronx Museum presentation, the exhibition will travel to the Jeu de Paume in Paris, France, and the Kumu Art Museum in Tallinn, Estonia.

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*Please note this exhibition has been postponed until further notice.

Over the last fifty years, Cuban artist Manuel Mendive has developed a highly personal examination of the African spiritual tradition of Yoruba through the experimental lens of contemporary art. The artist’s multidisciplinary work, in particular his performances, has become a vehicle for exploring the intersections between art, religion, philosophy, ethics, and anthropology. At the Bronx Museum, Mendive will present a new body of works focused on his continued interest in Yoruba mythology, pondering on man’s relationship with nature and spirituality. Conceptualized as a cohesive group of paintings and sculptures, the overall installation suggests an “ancestral tour” to the heart of nature. Steeped in religious and philosophical ideas, Mendive’s artworks invite the viewer to immerse in a mythical search for identity. The exhibition will also feature a new performance in September 2017 created by Mendive specifically for the Bronx Museum.

Past

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February 17, 2017 to July 3, 2017

February 17, 2017 to July 3, 2017

 

Wild Noise/Ruido Salvaje is an exploration of contemporary Cuban art from the 1970s to the present that looks at how Cuban artists both on the island and abroad have grappled with issues of identity, community, and the urban experience. Bringing together over 60 works by more than 30 artists from the Bronx Museum collection and other U.S. institutions and private collections, the exhibition will feature many artworks that will be publicly exhibited for the first time.

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March 1, 2017 to June 11, 2017

March 1, 2017 to June 11, 2017

 

Love Thy Neighbor is the third and final part of The Neighbors, an exhibition series guest curated by Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy for The Bronx Museum of the Arts. In this third iteration of the series, “the neighbor” is characterized as the figure of the “Other,” that is, an entity viewed as distinctly foreign from the community, but who ultimately plays a role in the group. By centering on the representation of cultural difference, Love Thy Neighbor is meant to be an occasion for considering alterity, for how diversity sensibly builds society. The exhibition features new work by visual artists Firelei Baez, Ignacio González-Lang, and Irvin Morazan, with the intent of exploring the cultural processes of “othering.” 
 

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March 1, 2017 to July 3, 2017

March 1, 2017 to July 3, 2017

 

The seven-part painting Reflecting on the Familiar is Hauben’s attempt at capturing the sense of envelopment, enormity, and often, of the incomprehension that comes with living in the congested urban environment of The Bronx. Rather than depicting just a small portion of his expansive view, Hauben enlarges the scale to create a multi-faceted vision of the world around him.

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March 1, 2017 to June 25, 2017

March 1, 2017 to June 25, 2017

 

At the Bronx Museum’s Terrace, Arlene Slavin will present a group of sculptures from Intersections, a series that plays off the principle of the sundial. In these works, Slavin employs crisscrossed, translucent colored webs which remain stable, while the shadow created by the works is in perpetual change. In addition to the works on the Terrace, Slavin will also create a site-specific installation with colored films on the windows in the Museum’s Second Floor, producing a modern riff on stained glass.

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February 15, 2017 to April 23, 2017

Bronx-born photographer Clayton Frazier has balanced a career in special education and history with his work creating publicity and video presentations for companies such as CBS, Warner Brothers, Arista Records, the United Nations, in addition to his membership in the photographic and video unit of the New York District Attorney’s Office. For this exhibition, Frazier presents a series of photographs from his time in the music and television industry alongside documentary images from the island of Saint Dominique, known today as Haiti (as well as the Dominican Republic). 

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January 4 - Ongoing

In honor of Black History Month, the Bronx Museum is featuring four works by the Bronx-born photographer Morton Broffman.

 

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January 4 – February 5, 2017

This month the Bronx Museum highlights the work of Brazilian artist Öyvind Fahlström. Working in a wide range of media and themes, Fahlström avoided affiliation with any art category throughout his brief albeit productive career. Equally influenced by surrealism, pop art, situationism, and even documentary filmmaking, Fahlström borrowed imagery and styles from comics and the media to create original and relevant artworks that unmask the absurdities of modern society.

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May 3, 2017 to May 29, 2017

May 3, 2017 to May 29, 2017

 

Organized by The Bronx Museum of the Arts Teen Council, this exhibition features artworks by New York City-based teen artists responding to the notion of time.

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South Bronx Waterfront Sagas
November 2, 2016 to February 19, 2017

Linda Cunningham explores the issues of time, transience, and contradictions through images of the shifting urban present. Environmental concerns juxtaposed against industry, urban blight, and the loss of the natural environment drive her practice, in addition to gentrification and the changing landscape of the Bronx, her home for many years. 

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November 2, 2016 – January 1, 2017

As a participant of the 1980s generation of artists that came of out of the Instituto Superior de Art (ISA), in Havana, Quisqueya Henriquez was deeply influenced by the conceptual and experimental pedagogical model promoted by ISA at the time. With a career spanning over twenty years, Henriquez has carefully built a coherent body of work that sustains a critical dialogue with international currents while also sharply tuned to Caribbean contemporary life and culture. Henriquez’s first mid-career survey was organized by the Bronx Museum in 2007.

 

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October 12, 2016 to February 12, 2017
The Neighbors, part two, in two parts: Sanctuary: Andrea Bowers and Home: Andrea Aragón establishes a dialogue on immigration through the work of American artist Andrea Bowers and Guatemalan photographer Andrea Aragón. This is the second iteration in the exhibition series The Neighbors, which addresses issues surrounding cultural uprooting and belonging, as well as social mobility and political resistance. 
 
 
 
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Symposium
September 15, 2016 to February 19, 2017

September 15, 2016 to February 19, 2017

 

Robert Raphael’s ceramic-based work draws on the complex history of decorative art, a tradition that intersects and runs parallel to the history of art. Rather than interpreting ornamentation as superficial, Raphael believes that the strength of decoration lies in its seductive nature and the complex meanings that often result when surface, mass, pattern, and cultural history conflate.

 

For the installation at The Bronx Museum of the Arts Raphael’s work focuses on classical ornamentation and its prevalence from historical time through to contemporary society. 

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July 13 to October 23, 2016

July 13 to October 23, 2016

 

This summer The Bronx Museum of the Arts will present Art AIDS America, the first exhibition to examine the deep and ongoing influence of the AIDS crisis on American art and culture. The exhibition will feature more than 125 works in a wide range of media dating from 1981 to the present day, by artists including Félix González-Torres, Derek Jackson, Kia Labeija, Annie Leibovitz, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Martin Wong. The exhibition, on view from July 13 through October 23,2016,  is organized by the Tacoma Art Museum in partnership with The Bronx Museum of the Arts.

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July 13 to October 23, 2016

 

In 2007, the Museum of Modern Art exhibited a series of drawings by French post-Impressionist painter and draftsman Georges Seurat. Frank Gimpaya was taken by the painter’s 1882 rendering of The Veil.  He was inspired to create a photographic tableau of this drawing as a means of instruction for the photography classes he taught at Saint Peter's University in Jersey City, New Jersey.

 
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July 13 to September 25, 2016

July 13 to September 25, 2016

 

Caza: Rochele Gomez, Margaret Lee, Alejandra Seeber is part of The Neighbors, a series of three small-scale, successive exhibitions of contemporary art organized by guest curator Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy for The Bronx Museum of the Arts. 

 

What would it mean to tame art? And, what or whom would this taming of art serve? The group exhibition Caza—a word that in Spanish means “searching” or “hunting,” and is a homophone of “casa” (home)—is an attempt to respond to such questions, or an occasion to at least consider them. 

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Organized by the Tampa Museum of Art in collaboration with the Bronx Museum of the Arts
October 8, 2016 to February 5, 2017

On view at the Tampa Museum of Art.

 

Complicated Beauty, a survey exhibition of contemporary Cuban art from the 1970s to the present, will be the first of several Cuban art exhibitions at the Museum. Inspired by historic connections between Tampa and Havana, as well as the recent reopening of relations between the US and Cuba, Complicated Beauty will highlight several recent acquisitions to the Tampa Museum of Art’s permanent collection, including Simply Beautiful by Mabel Poblet and Cada Sonido es una Forma del Tiempo (Every Sound is a Shape of Time) by Glenda León. Alongside these and other artworks from the Tampa collection, the exhibition will also include numerous loaned artworks from the collections of the Bronx Museum of the Arts and several private collections.

 

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April 6 to May 30, 2016

April 6 to May 30, 2016

 

Focusing initially on artists of African, Asian and Latin American descent, the Bronx Museum Permanent Collection was created in 1986 with the goal to reflect the borough's dynamic communities. Beyond The Veil focuses on an eclectic group of contemporary artists in the Permanent Collection whose works convey the complex mediation between the self and the other, between one’s allegiance to tradition and the appeal of globalism.

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Spotlight: John Ahearn and Rigoberto Torres

 

This exhibition highlights a group of sculptures by John Ahearn and Rigoberto Torres in the Bronx Museum Permanent Collection. Whether produced individually or in collaboration, this series of works convey both artists’ commitment to representing their local communities. John Ahearn moved from downtown Manhattan to the South Bronx in 1979 and began making his first casts of local residents at Fashion Moda, an alternative gallery that thrived in the South Bronx during the 1980s and early 1990s. It was during one of these live casting sessions that Rigoberto Torres met Ahearn. As it happened, Torres had already been introduced to casting and painting at his uncle’s statuary factory. At first, Torres volunteered as a model and later became Ahearn’s long-time collaborator. Over the span of a 30-year career, Ahearn and Torres have exhibited their work widely across the United States, Europe, and Latin America.  

 

In addition to works previously collected by the Bronx Museum, the present exhibition also includes a suite of busts recently donated by Krasdale Foods, Inc. that were originally exhibited at their Community Gallery in the early 1980s. Transforming the everyday man, woman, and child into monumental works of art, these casts evidence the trust and respect that both Ahearn and Torres established with South Bronx residents. 

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March 2 to May 29, 2016

March 2 to May 29, 2016

 

Since 2007 Michele Brody has been serving tea to the public through the interactive community-based project Reflections in Tea.  The ritual performance of preparing loose-leaf tea within special paper filters is shared with individuals and groups. The participants’ conversations are then preserved by being transcribed onto the stained tea bags that have been dried and flattened, culminating in the creation of an ever-growing set of fluttering paper quilts. Through the experience of reading participants’ stories, Reflections in Tea reflects back to the public both a visual and visceral experience of their collective memories and experiences.

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February 24 to May 8, 2016

February 24 to May 8, 2016

 

Since the mid-1990s, Jill Baroff has been strongly influenced by Japanese architecture, which she categorizes as “floor-based,” as opposed to the West’s emphasis on verticality. During a six-month NEA fellowship in Japan, Baroff was captivated by the way light traveled across the weave of her tatami floor during the day; constantly changing the patterns of the mats and consequently affecting the shape and feel of the interior spaces she occupied. In 1997, for an exhibition in Germany, Baroff achieved the same kind of effect using corrugated paper. For the installation at the Bronx Museum Terrace, Baroff chose to work with tree trunks collected from a grove in Upstate New York.

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February 3 to June 26, 2016

February 3 to June 26, 2016

 

Widely recognized as one of the very few female pioneers of Land Art, artist Michelle Stuart is known for her nature-based art dating to the late 1960s and 1970s. Comparatively lesser-known are her remarkable photographic works, which constitute a crucial part of her oeuvre and have been her primary focus over the past several years.

 

Organized by guest curator Gregory Volk, the exhibition consists of twelve recent large-scale works—including a major wall piece created specifically for this exhibition—as well as two important pieces from the early 1980s that can be seen as precursors to Stuart’s later direction.  This exhibition is the first museum treatment of Stuart’s photography-based works.

 

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April 6 to June 26, 2016

April 6 to June 26, 2016

 

The South Bronx Trades series, initiated in 2011 and still in progress, documents the active industries and manufacturing enterprises of Port Morris and Hunts Point, revealing to the viewer the unseen places and unheralded workers of the South Bronx. In contrast with the grim imagery often associated with the South Bronx, Fougeron’s photographs show us that industry persists and thrives in the borough. 

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April 6 to June 26, 2016

April 6 to June 26, 2016

 

The works in Bronx Focus: Paintings by Valeri Larko serve as a record of the vibrant graffiti culture as displayed in structures throughout the borough now, and on the verge of extinction. Larko’s paintings remind viewers of a Bronx that coexists as both a city and nature reserve, capable of gritty and touching beauty, while also focusing on themes of memory, preservation, and expansion. 

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November 4, 2015 to March 13, 2016

November 4, 2015 to March 13, 2016

 

Martin Wong: Human Instamatic will be the first museum retrospective of the work of Chinese-American painter Martin Wong (1946-1999) since his untimely death. The exhibition will offer the first in-depth assessment of Wong’s formal contributions as a painter, placing his work in line with such 20th-century painters as Marsden Hartley and Alice Neel, both renowned for their insightful portraits of the communities in which they lived. Co-curated by Sergio Bessa and Yasmin Ramírez, the exhibition will feature over 90 of Wong’s paintings with rarely-seen archival materials from the Martin Wong Papers at the Fales Library of New York University.

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Artworks from the Permanent Collection
October 24, 2015 to January 17, 2016

October 24, 2015 to January 17, 2016

 

The exhibition reflects on the legacy of constructivist art as reinterpreted by contemporary  artists. Featuring works by Vito Acconci, Joseph Albers, Paul Chan, Marcelo Cidade, Glenn Goldberg, Mary Heilmann, Elizabeth Jobim, Jarbas Lopes, Dennis Oppenheim, and Liliana Porter. In addition, a group of chairs by Mary Heilmann especially commissioned by the Whitney Museum suggests the connection between art and design.

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October 15, 2015 to February 14, 2016

October 15, 2015 to February 14, 2016

 

The Bangladeshi American Creative Collective (BACC) is proud to present Transitions: New Photography from Bangladesh. With the rise of factories, investors, and development, the landscape of Bangladesh is changing. This exhibition will feature nine Bangladeshi photographers whose work reflects a diverse group of people, shifting economies, and changing lands. Its aim is to not only to collect and exhibit photography as art; but also as ideas about the country of Bangladesh.

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September 26, 2015 to February 14, 2016

September 26, 2015 to February 14, 2016

 

Trees Are Alphabets considers how the sun, rain, wind, and soil constantly transform the shapes of trees since evolving in primeval forests. Artist E. J. McAdams sees in these transformations a vision of an epiphenomenon – like a text – that is forever changing. For the duration of the exhibition, McAdams will write with tree branches, in the hope to make space for a resonant poetic emanation to emerge out of this human-tree collaboration.

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The Third AIM Biennial
July 9 to September 20, 2015

July 9 to September 20, 2015

 

Curated by Bronx-based artists Hatuey Ramos-Fermín and Laura Napier, Bronx Calling: The Third AIM Biennial features the work of seventy-two emerging artists engaged in the Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) Program (classes of 2014 and 2015). AIM provides professional development opportunities for emerging artists residing and working in the New York metropolitan area. 

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July 2 to October 18, 2015

July 2 to October 18, 2015

 

Organized by guest curators Johanna Fernández and Yasmín Ramírez, ¡Presente! The Young Lords in New York was the first museum survey to examine the radical social group founded by Puerto Rican youth in New York and Chicago in the 1960s. The Young Lords’ impactful political activities, community-focused initiatives, and spirited affirmation of Puerto Rican identity inspired both a generation of artists active during this era and artists working today. 

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Outdoor Art on Randall's Island
May 30 to November 2015

May 30 to November 2015

 

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance, the Bronx Museum of the Arts and Made Event are pleased to present FLOW annual summer art exhibitions along the shoreline at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the shoreline through artistic expression, while calling visitors to interact with and care for the Park’s island environment. Each year, FLOW features site specific projects by participants in the Bronx Museum’s Artists in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

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May 28 to June 14, 2015

May 28 to June 14, 2015

 

An exhibition of teen artwork curated by The Bronx Museum Teen Council: "As millennials we grew up under the influence of video games; they taught us all about secrets and boundaries. They showed us that secrets make the game interesting, and we learned how to destroy and build boundaries in order to access those secrets. Secrets and boundaries are significant because they make us human. In a world without secrets and boundaries, we would be unable to distinguish between our inner and outer selves. This exhibition showcases artwork that explores these themes alongside works from the museum's permanent collection."

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May 21 to July 12, 2015 at El Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes

May 21 to July 12, 2015

 

The Bronx Museum of the Arts and El Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes de La Habana (MNBA) have announced an unprecedented joint arts initiative that is the culmination of years of planning and collaboration. Wild Noise: Artwork from The Bronx Museum of the Arts and El Museo Nacional de Bellas Artes represents the most extensive visual arts exchange between the two countries in more than 50 years, and will include major exhibitions at MNBA and the Bronx Museum; an artist exchange with U.S. artist Mary Mattingly and Cuban artist Humberto Diaz; a teen exchange program; a series of educational and public programs; and the publication of a dual-language publication that will extend the impact of Wild Noise beyond the audiences that participate directly in the initiative.

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March 29 to June 14, 2015

March 29 to June 14, 2015

 

The selection of works presented in Jaime Davidovich: Adventures of the Avant-Garde charts the artist’s transit through different iterations of the avant-garde; from an early exploration in the monochrome’s possibilities and spatial concerns that would also later inform his site-specific works of the late sixties and early seventies, to the video works of the of the same period up until the 1990s, which not only pioneered the use of television as a medium but also addressed themes such as identity, diaspora and globalization.

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March 26 to June 21, 2015

March 26 to June 21, 2015

 

Featuring three new works, the terrace installation Please Touch conveys artist Raul Mourão's awareness of the city, with its characters, architecture, objects and accidents. Displaced from their original sites and stripped of any function, mundane street elements are further altered in shape and scale by the artist. With its humorous nods to constructive and conceptual art, Please Touch entails active contemplation from the spectator, in that it extends familiar objects into the arena of the nonsensical.
 

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Works from the Shelley and Donald Rubin Private Collection
March 19 to June 21, 2015

March 19 to June 21, 2015

 

The recent announcement of a new re-engagement policy between the United States and Cuba has increased the level of expectation as to what the future of the island will be. While this new political openness will undoubtedly attract new markets and an influx of foreign investment, truly creative solutions for the local communities and their diverse culture will have to come from within.  By featuring a selection of works from the Shelley and Donald Rubin Private Collection, the exhibition Cuba Libre! suggests that contemporary Cuban artists have already been engaged in this discussion, providing thoughtful materials for their audiences to ponder on their diversity and rich historical legacy.

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Jules Aarons, Morton Broffman, and Joe Conzo
February 26 to June 14, 2015

February 26 to June 14, 2015

 

Three Photographers from the Bronx showcases work by three Bronx-born photographers who captured significant moments of societal and urban change in the borough and across the country during a period marked by important social, cultural and political transformations. The exhibition features over 80 works, from depictions of daily life in the Bronx and Far Rockaways in the early 1950s, to images of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, to a searing look at Bronx community protests in the early 1980s. Together these works create an exchange across three distinct and intertwined moments, exploring the legacy of community activism and urban change and launching a dialogue surrounding the challenges the Bronx and similar communities continue to face today.

 

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February 12 to May 31, 2015
February 12 to May 31, 2015
 
Escape Route: Paintings and Drawings by Jeffrey Spencer Hargrave will present a selection of works by the New York based artist created from 2011 to 2014 that deal with issues related to race, religion and sexuality. Since 1998 Hargrave has produced a compelling, deeply personal body of work incorporating painting, drawing, sculpture and video that explore the dynamics between race, sexuality and religion in relation to his upbringing in the south and early adulthood as an African American gay male coming to terms with racial and sexual identity.
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January 29 to June 28, 2015

January 29 to June 28, 2015

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from the Arachnae Series by Aristides Logothetis
January 15 to April 12, 2015

Craft And Colony: from the Arachnae Series by Aristides Logothetis presents a new large sculpture by New York-based artist Aristides Logothetis created in 2014 that deals with issues related to the many ways visual signs are coded through culture, and then used as support of systems, constructs, and power hierarchies. Since the 1990’s Logothetis has produced a diverse body of work incorporating sculpture, painting, photography, collage, and installation that explore visual perception and its relationship to a reordered, very personal combination of formalism, narrative, process, and metaphor.

 

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December 4, 2014 to March 15, 2015

Bosco Sodi’s paintings and sculptures play with notions of experimentation and material spontaneity. In his latest installation, Sodi utilized the remains of sculptures damaged during Hurricane Sandy as a foundation to create new, durable artworks that could transcend the limits of time. The waterlogged remnants were clumped onto a circular base, creating a cluster of stalagmite shapes over a period of time, which were then cast in bronze. For Sodi, the physical process involved a balance of chance and minimal control, where the “goal is to find the accident that is achieved when many variables are involved.” 

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Thursday, November 6, 2014 to Sunday, January 4, 2015

Suture is the culmination of Michael Joo’s ongoing research about Cameron’s Line, the geological rift that straddles from Manhattan and the Bronx, through Ridgefield, Connecticut, and ultimately into Vermont.  As in Joo’s recent exhibition at the Aldrich Museum, the artworks on display at the Bronx Museum are site specific and conceived specifically for its lobby space. Joo is interested in alternative ways of looking at and depicting the land, using a vast array of photography and media techniques to match each location’s unique physiognomy. 

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works from the permanent collection
September 11, 2014 to February 15, 2015

Over the course of its forty-year history, the Bronx Museum has drawn together a significant collection of prints and graphic-art works, guided by its mission to give visibility to artists of African, Asian, and Latin American descent. For these artists, the print medium has been an invaluable tool for channeling their aesthetic and political concerns. Due to its mass reproducibility, economy, ease of distribution, and collaborative character, printmaking has long been considered a vehicle for social agency and has played a major role in politically mobilizing different communities and constituencies.

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September 11 to November 23, 2014

First shown in 1991 at MoMA PS1 as part of the exhibition And the Mind Grew Fingers, S- T- A- B- is an installation composed of welded rolled steel angle, steel plate and red vacuum formed letters that spell the word “stab” in fragments. S- T- A- B- can be seen as the diagram of a street fight, reflecting Oppenheim's goal to emulate the emotional, stuttered speech that occurs in extreme situations. The Bronx Museum's installation will present the entire work on its North Wing terrace.

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September 11, 2014 to January 11, 2015

The Bronx - Paris - Los Angeles - early 1990s - hip hop. This culture of music, dance, art and fashion is forever in its nascent and most authentic in Here I Am: Photographs by Lisa Leone. From Nas in the first studio recordings for what would become his iconic debut album Illmatic, to Snoop on the set of his first video, from ingénue Debi Mazar on the subway to Grandmaster Flash at a RockSteady reunion, Leone’s photographs open portals to the sounds, places and, most importantly, the people who forged and continue to influence the energy that is hip hop.

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World Trade Center: Concrete Abstract #2
August 28 to October 25, 2014

In 2011, Kremer was granted access to the construction site of One World Trade Center, where he photographed until 2013. Kremer’s Concrete Abstract series aims for an individual and universal response to the destruction and rebuilding of the World Trade Towers.  In each piece, he edits, dissects, layers and arranges a multitude of images to build unique and evocative abstract compositions. In some of the work, he includes details from images of the public record directly following the attacks. In conjunction with his solo exhibition at Julie Saul Gallery, and the opening of the new building, The Bronx Museum of the Arts along with The Museum of the City of New York and The Brooklyn Academy of Music will show individual images from the series.

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July 17 to November 16, 2014

SuperPuesto is a temporary pavilion by Terence Gower commissioned by The Bronx Museum of the Arts in collaboration with the Andrew Freedman Home for Beyond the Supersquare, the first U.S. museum exhibition to examine the complicated legacies of modernist architecture in Latin America and the Caribbean through the perspectives of 30 contemporary artists. With the goal of providing an immersive space for visitors to experience the exhibition’s artistic and architectural themes, SuperPuesto also serves as an annex for educational and public programs related to Beyond the Supersquare.

Location: Andrew Freedman Home Garden, 1125 Grand Concourse between 166th and McClellan Streets, Bronx

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Triple Point (Planetarium)
July 3 to August 24, 2014

Sarah Sze’s Triple Point (Planetarium), one of the works created for the U.S. Pavilion at the 2013 Venice Biennale, will be on view at The Bronx Museum of the Arts from July 3 to August 24, 2014.

 

Sze’s work attempts to navigate and model the ceaseless proliferation of information and objects in contemporary life. Incorporating elements of painting, architecture, and installation within her sculpture, Sze investigates the value we place on objects and explores how objects ascribe meaning to the places and times we inhabit. Sze’s U.S. Pavilion was consistently cited as one of the standout national pavilions at the 55th Venice Biennale.

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June 20 to September 21, 2014

Drift is based on Joo’s meditation on Cameron’s Line, an ancient suture fault that traces the edge of the continental collision that initiated the formation of the Appalachian Mountains. The line is defined by a belt of marble that connects Inwood in Manhattan, Morrisania in the Bronx, the Sawmill River in Westchester County, and the Housatonic River Valley in Connecticut and Massachusetts, as well as the famous quarries of Vermont. Curated by Richard Klein and Alyson Baker.

Michael Joo: Drift is on view at The Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum from April 6 to September 21, 2014. The companion exhibition Drift (Bronx) will be on view at The Bronx Museum of the Arts from June 20 through September 21, 2014.

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May 1, 2014 to January 11, 2015

Beyond the Supersquare explores the indelible influence of Latin American and Caribbean modernist architecture on contemporary art. The exhibition features over 30 artists and more than 60 artworks, including photography, video, sculpture, installation, and drawing, that respond to major Modernist architectural projects constructed in Latin America and the Caribbean from the 1920s through the 1960s. Beyond the Supersquare examines the complicated legacies of modernism through architecture and thought—as embodied by the political, economic, environmental, and social challenges faced by countries throughout Latin America—through the unique perspective of artists working today.

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May 1 to August 17, 2014

Shyu Ruey-Shiann works with different materials and media to explore themes related to our environment. The installation One Kind of Behavior is inspired by the quasi-mechanical movements of creatures such as the hermit crabs. The artist sees in the random opening and closing of their shells on the beach, a stark contrast with contemporary society where things move at high speed. Additionally, the fact that hermit crabs occupy shells discarded by other species becomes another source of interest to the artist, who sees in this special relationship a metaphor for our human condition. Contrasting man and animal behavior, One Kind of Behavior asks us to consider the environmental consequences of our mechanical impulses on nature. 

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May 1, 2014 to January 11, 2015

From Puerto Rico to the South Bronx, the casita, or “little house” in Spanish, is the social centerpiece and focal point of many community gardens. New York Restoration Project (NYRP), in partnership with the Urban Air Foundation, enlisted TEN Arquitectos and engineers at Buro Happold to rethink the traditional casita as a modular kit of parts. NYRP staff will work with members of the Willis Avenue Community Garden in Mott Haven, Bronx, to assemble the pilot structure in their garden in Spring 2014.

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Performing the Library
May 1 to May 31, 2014

Bronx Lab: Performing the Library displays the outcome of a workshop, entitled "Performing the Library," held in the Summer of 2013 at the Università Iuav di Venezia (IUAV) as an intensive 3-weeks university-level studio whose aim was to design one or more "library" spaces. A video about the workshop’s activities and process accompanies boards illustrating the students’ projects, and study models that contain objects belonging to members of their own families, which were used to establish spatial relationships as conceptual stage-sets for future buildings.

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Art and Music at Randall's Island
May 18 to November, 2014

The Randall’s Island Park Alliance, the Bronx Museum of the Arts and Made Event are pleased to present FLOW annual summer art exhibitions along the shoreline at Randall’s Island Park in New York City. FLOW is aimed at fostering appreciation of the shoreline through artistic expression, while calling visitors to interact with and care for the Park’s island environment. Each year, FLOW features site specific projects by participants in the Bronx Museum’s Artists in the Marketplace (AIM) program for emerging artists.

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March 16 to August 24, 2014

The series of paintings Veterans conveys rarely told personal stories of American men and women from the U.S. Military. The paintings, interviews conducted by the artist, and the accompanying stories by Sophie Rand convey the pressing need for a civilian awareness of the realities and experiences of veterans from current and past generations. The ten paintings selected for this exhibition focus primarily on Bronx residents, including portraits of Leroy Archible and Carmen Rodriguez, who were instrumental in introducing Talbot to veterans in the Bronx.

 

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March 6 to April 7, 2014

Featuring works by: TSENG KWONG CHI, HUMA BHABHA, JAMEL SHABAZZ, LUIS GISPERT, AARON SISKIND, TEHCHING HSIEH, SARAH LUCAS, DAVID S. ALLEE.

 

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October 6, 2013 - February 16, 2014

A comprehensive survey of the works of American sculptor Tony Feher, this exhibition features key artworks that use everyday objects and found materials in a post-minimalist aesthetic, displaying the richness and complexity of Feher’s investigations.  The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated monograph and reveals Feher's very personal vocabulary developed and refined over the past decades. Organized by Claudia Schmuckli, Director and Chief Curator of Blaffer Art Museum at the University of Houston.

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ART IS OUR LAST HOPE
September 19, 2013 - April 13, 2014

Born in Recife, Brazil, Paulo Bruscky began his career in the late 1960s, becoming involved with the international mail-art movement and participating in Fluxus exhibitions around the world. In the following decades, he experimented with new media and performance. Bruscky’s work reflects a continuous engagement with Recife and its culture, filtered and documented in the artist’s books, photographs, and other media. Organized by Antonio Sergio Bessa, Director of Programs at The Bronx Museum of the Arts.

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October 13, 2013 - February 16, 2014

The Bronx is considered one of the most diverse communities in America, as well as the home of Hip Hop and Salsa. For the families who have called this borough a home, Orchard Beach remains a treasured respite from the sweltering confines of the concrete jungle.  Lawrence’s portraits of these summertime regulars celebrate the pride and dignity of those who frequent Orchard Beach.

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New California Art circa 1970

State of Mind: New California Art Circa 1970 is a thorough investigation of seminal conceptual and related avant-garde activities in the late 1960s and early 70s and the critical interchange between artists living in the Golden State. The exhibition demonstrates the immense changes in artistic practice that coincided with the burgeoning number of art schools...

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The Second AIM Biennial

Bronx Calling: The Second AIM Biennial features the work of seventy-three emerging artists engaged in the Artist in the Marketplace (AIM) Program (classes of 2012 and 2013). AIM provides professional development opportunities for emerging artists in the greater New York City area. The multi-site exhibition will be presented at the Bronx Museum of the Arts, Wave Hill, and 1285 Avenue of the Americas Art Gallery, and will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue. Organized by Gabriel de Guzman, Elizabeth M. Grady, and Lia Zaaloff.

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A year ago, Todd Heisler—a New York Times staff photographer, who’s twice won the Pulitzer Prize for photography—and Susan Hartman—a journalist, whose stories have been featured in The New York Times, Newsday, and The Christian Science Monitor—collaborated on a photo essay about an extraordinary prayer call, which unites members of the Ebenezer Assembly of God Church in the Bronx...

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July 19, 2012 - June 2, 2013

Does style define man? For centuries, style has been the focus of debate whether concerning writing, behavior or fashion. Around the late 1970s, the term “wild style” began to circulate among graffiti artists in the South Bronx to denote the kind of graphics involving complex, interlocking letters with aerodynamic forms. Coined by the legendary Tracy 168, the expression became associated with the rise of graffiti art in New York City, specifically in the Bronx, in the 1970s and that ultimately became a global movement. Started as an underground movement, the “wild style” is now part of the mainstream, studied as an art form and exhibited in museums all over the world. Bronx Lab—Style Wars features a number of works that reflect on that era to pose the question of what is today’s style.


Artists include Afrika Bambaataa, Henry Chalfant, Lady K Fever, Keith Haring, Dr. Lakra, Valerie Larko, Glendalys Medina, Johnny Perez, Tim Rollins and K.O.S., Rigoberto Torres, Tats Cru

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February 12, 2012 – June 11, 2012

The MIT List Visual Arts Center in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts presents the first United States museum survey of the work of Chilean-born video artist Juan Downey (1940–1993). Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect features a selection of key works by this under-recognized pioneer of video art. A fellow at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual studies in 1973 and 1975, Downey played a significant role in the New York art scene of the 1970s and 1980s.

Ranging thematically over several decades of the artist’s work, the exhibition includes early experiments with art and technology that mark a shift from object-based artistic practice to an experiential approach seeking to combine interactive performance with sculpture and video.  Along with this foundational early work, the exhibition also features Downey’s video installations of the 1970s and 1980s. These combine an autobiographical approach with the style of anthropological documentary—one of his most important contributions to the medium. In Downey’s later work, the intellectual and historical myths of European culture, as well as the roots of Latin American identity, are explored in complex video work that utilizes associative visual metaphors, collage-like techniques, and non-linear narrative.

In his two major series of works, Video Trans Americas and The Thinking Eye, Downey subjects the canonical and historical narratives of Western art to rich technical, visual, and intertextual analysis. In Video Trans Americas, begun in 1971, Downey anticipates much of the current interest in urbanism, post-colonial theory, and locality in contemporary artistic practice by mixing anthropology with autobiography. The Thinking Eye, a series made for public television, subjects the foundational concepts of Western culture—including the idea of the self—to linguistic, psychoanalytic, art historical, and semiotic interpretation, all through Downey’s mastery of video technology.

 

Presented in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect is organized by Valerie Smith, Curator at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. The exhibition will travel to the Arizona State University Art Museum, Tempe, AZ (September 24–December 31, 2011) and the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York (February 12–May 20, 2012).


All images: Juan Downey Estate, Courtesy of Marilys B. Downey

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2011 to 2013

smARTpowers, an initiative of the Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, administered by The Bronx Museum of the Arts, sends 15 U.S. artists abroad to work with local artists and young people around the world to create community-based art projects. Selected artists design and implement programs within a 45 day period in cooperation with local arts organizations in China, Ecuador, Egypt, Ghana, India, Kosovo, Lebanon, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Turkey, and Venezuela.

 

smARTpower artists are strongly encouraged to create a tangible legacy of the work, to remain in country, through a variety of visual arts media, including painting, sculpture, drawing, video, installation, photo-based work, public art, and interdisciplinary projects. Projects emphasize participatory work and address a full range of relevant subjects including, but not limited to, women's empowerment, the environment, health, education, and civic engagement.

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September 29, 2011 – January 15, 2012
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The First AIM Biennial
June 26 to September 5, 2011
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AIM 29
June 21 to September 13, 2009
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Modern and Contemporary Works from the JP Morgan Chase Art Collection
March 5 to May 10, 2009
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From 1950s to Now
September 14 to January 25, 2009
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The World Outside A Survey Exhibition 1991-2007
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AIM 27
April 1 to August 19, 2007
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Liberty
June 3 to September 5, 2016

June 3 to September 5, 2016

 

New York-based artist Hank Willis Thomas explores issues of identity, media, race, and popular culture through sculptures, photographs, and text-based works. He often appropriates recognizable imagery from advertisements and branding campaigns in order to question the ways in which commercial media distorts the ways in which audiences see themselves and each other. 

 

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May 14 to November 2016

May 14 to November 2016

 

FLOW.16 – this year’s sixth annual exhibition – will be open to the public from May-November, and will feature installations reflecting and encouraging interaction with Randall's Island Park’s history and environment. This event is created with support from New York City Department of Cultural Affairs.