Current

Although admission is still FREE, for the health and safety of our staff and community, we are requiring visitors to book timed tickets in advance.
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Home is a familiar place where you can find comfort in your surroundings. During the quarantine home has also become a space to learn, grow, build and rest. Each of the artworks we selected depicts our cultures and community as we see them. By showing the perspectives of the less represented lives of the people of New York we are centering the positive aspects of our city: our home.
 
This exhibit was curated by the Bronx Museum's Teen Council in the winter of 2020-21 and features works from the Museum's permanent collection.
 
 

El hogar es un lugar que se nos hace familiar donde una persona se encuentra cómoda con lo que le rodea. Durante la cuarentena el hogar se ha vuelto un espacio donde aprender y crecer, crear y descansar. Cada una de las obras que seleccionamos representan nuestras cultura y comunidades como las vemos. Al mostrar las perspectivas de las vidas con menos representación en la ciudad de Nueva York nos dedicamos a prestarle atención a los aspectos positivos de nuestra ciudad: nuestro hogar.

La curaduría de esta muestra estuvo a cargo del Concejo de jóvenes del Bronx durante el invierno del 2020-21 y presenta obras de la colección permanente del museo.

 

 

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January 21, 2021 - May 30, 2021

Shaun Leonardo: The Breath of Empty Space presents drawings by the Brooklyn-based artist that critique how mediated images of systemic violence against Black and Brown young men in contemporary American history have shaped our fear, empathy, and perception. Created between 2014 and 2019, the works trace high profile stories of lives ended or forever altered by systems of law enforcement from the 1970s to today. 

 

Shaun Leonardo: The Breath of Empty Space, El aliento del espacio vacío, presenta dibujos, del artista basado en Brooklyn, que critica cómo las imágenes mediatizadas de la violencia sistémica en contra de jóvenes negros y otras personas de color  en la historia contemporánea de los Estados Unidos han moldeado nuestro miedo, empatía y percepción. Creadas entre el año 2014 y 2019, las obras trazan las historias de alto perfil de las vidas perdidas o alteradas para siempre por los sistemas policíacos desde la década de 1970 hasta hoy en día.

 
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November 24, 2020 - May 24, 2021

The Bronx Museum of the Arts is expanding outside with #SeeMeBronx, an interactive project about visibility, intersectionality, and identity. The project kicks off the Museum's 50th anniversary, which is focused on visibility as a tenet of social justice. As we take off into our next fifty years, we hope to reaffirm our mission as an admission-free, liberated space for communities to come to enjoy art and have important conversations. #SeeMeBronx was created as a way to spark conversations within our many intersecting communities about identity, equity, and inclusion. Sometimes the best way to dive into dialogue is by asking tough but important questions. We hope you will join us in shaping the conversation with your queries. 

 

Upcoming

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October 20, 2021 - January 16, 2022

This fall, the Museum will showcase Bronx Calling: The Fifth AIM Biennial, an exhibition series highlighting artists from the Bronx Museum’s AIM professional development fellowship program. Since its inception, AIM has supported over 1,200 artists, including Diana Al-Hadid, Firelei Báez, Njideka Akunili Crosby, Abigail DeVille, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Glenn Ligon, Sarah Oppenheimer, Jacolby Satterwhite, and Lucia Hierro. The fifth iteration of Bronx Calling will showcase the work of 69 New York City-based emerging artists from the 2018 and 2019 cycles.

 

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April 28, 2021 - September 12, 2021

Born In Flames: Feminist Futures​ dives into the speculative, globally informed visions of artists who explore the possibilities of new futures. This group exhibition of femme-identified artists critically examines current struggles for equity by exploring strategies for justice and equality through multifaceted futurisms. Including works created over the last five decades, the show demonstrates not only the artists' place within a futurist lineage, but also exposes the ongoing impulse to imagine new realities on their own terms. Artists Include: Caitlin Cherry​, Chitra Ganesh​, Clarissa Tossin, Huma Bhaba, Firelei Baez, Lizzie Borden​, Maria Berrio, Pamela Phatsimo Sunstrum, Rose B. Simpson, Saya Woolfalk, Shoshanna Weinberger, Tourmaline, Wangechi Mutu, and Sin Wai Kin fka Victoria Sin. 

Past

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July 19, 2012 - June 2, 2013

Does style define man? For centuries, style has been the focus of debate whether concerning writing, behavior or fashion. Around the late 1970s, the term “wild style” began to circulate among graffiti artists in the South Bronx to denote the kind of graphics involving complex, interlocking letters with aerodynamic forms. Coined by the legendary Tracy 168, the expression became associated with the rise of graffiti art in New York City, specifically in the Bronx, in the 1970s and that ultimately became a global movement. Started as an underground movement, the “wild style” is now part of the mainstream, studied as an art form and exhibited in museums all over the world. Bronx Lab—Style Wars features a number of works that reflect on that era to pose the question of what is today’s style.


Artists include Afrika Bambaataa, Henry Chalfant, Lady K Fever, Keith Haring, Dr. Lakra, Valerie Larko, Glendalys Medina, Johnny Perez, Tim Rollins and K.O.S., Rigoberto Torres, Tats Cru

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February 12, 2012 – June 11, 2012

The MIT List Visual Arts Center in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts presents the first United States museum survey of the work of Chilean-born video artist Juan Downey (1940–1993). Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect features a selection of key works by this under-recognized pioneer of video art. A fellow at MIT’s Center for Advanced Visual studies in 1973 and 1975, Downey played a significant role in the New York art scene of the 1970s and 1980s.

Ranging thematically over several decades of the artist’s work, the exhibition includes early experiments with art and technology that mark a shift from object-based artistic practice to an experiential approach seeking to combine interactive performance with sculpture and video.  Along with this foundational early work, the exhibition also features Downey’s video installations of the 1970s and 1980s. These combine an autobiographical approach with the style of anthropological documentary—one of his most important contributions to the medium. In Downey’s later work, the intellectual and historical myths of European culture, as well as the roots of Latin American identity, are explored in complex video work that utilizes associative visual metaphors, collage-like techniques, and non-linear narrative.

In his two major series of works, Video Trans Americas and The Thinking Eye, Downey subjects the canonical and historical narratives of Western art to rich technical, visual, and intertextual analysis. In Video Trans Americas, begun in 1971, Downey anticipates much of the current interest in urbanism, post-colonial theory, and locality in contemporary artistic practice by mixing anthropology with autobiography. The Thinking Eye, a series made for public television, subjects the foundational concepts of Western culture—including the idea of the self—to linguistic, psychoanalytic, art historical, and semiotic interpretation, all through Downey’s mastery of video technology.

 

Presented in collaboration with The Bronx Museum of the Arts, Juan Downey: The Invisible Architect is organized by Valerie Smith, Curator at the Haus der Kulturen der Welt in Berlin. The exhibition will travel to the Arizona State University Art Museum, Tempe, AZ (September 24–December 31, 2011) and the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York (February 12–May 20, 2012).


All images: Juan Downey Estate, Courtesy of Marilys B. Downey

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2011 to 2013

smARTpowers, an initiative of the Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs, administered by The Bronx Museum of the Arts, sends 15 U.S. artists abroad to work with local artists and young people around the world to create community-based art projects. Selected artists design and implement programs within a 45 day period in cooperation with local arts organizations in China, Ecuador, Egypt, Ghana, India, Kosovo, Lebanon, Nepal, Nigeria, Pakistan, the Philippines, Kenya, Sri Lanka, Turkey, and Venezuela.

 

smARTpower artists are strongly encouraged to create a tangible legacy of the work, to remain in country, through a variety of visual arts media, including painting, sculpture, drawing, video, installation, photo-based work, public art, and interdisciplinary projects. Projects emphasize participatory work and address a full range of relevant subjects including, but not limited to, women's empowerment, the environment, health, education, and civic engagement.