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Although admission is still FREE, for the health and safety of our staff and community, we are requiring visitors to book timed tickets in advance.
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Home is a familiar place where you can find comfort in your surroundings. During the quarantine home has also become a space to learn, grow, build and rest. Each of the artworks we selected depicts our cultures and community as we see them. By showing the perspectives of the less represented lives of the people of New York we are centering the positive aspects of our city: our home.
 
This exhibit was curated by the Bronx Museum's Teen Council in the winter of 2020-21 and features works from the Museum's permanent collection.
 
 

El hogar es un lugar que se nos hace familiar donde una persona se encuentra cómoda con lo que le rodea. Durante la cuarentena el hogar se ha vuelto un espacio donde aprender y crecer, crear y descansar. Cada una de las obras que seleccionamos representan nuestras cultura y comunidades como las vemos. Al mostrar las perspectivas de las vidas con menos representación en la ciudad de Nueva York nos dedicamos a prestarle atención a los aspectos positivos de nuestra ciudad: nuestro hogar.

La curaduría de esta muestra estuvo a cargo del Concejo de jóvenes del Bronx durante el invierno del 2020-21 y presenta obras de la colección permanente del museo.

 

 

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January 21, 2021 - May 30, 2021

Shaun Leonardo: The Breath of Empty Space presents drawings by the Brooklyn-based artist that critique how mediated images of systemic violence against Black and Brown young men in contemporary American history have shaped our fear, empathy, and perception. Created between 2014 and 2019, the works trace high profile stories of lives ended or forever altered by systems of law enforcement from the 1970s to today. 

 

Shaun Leonardo: The Breath of Empty Space, El aliento del espacio vacío, presenta dibujos, del artista basado en Brooklyn, que critica cómo las imágenes mediatizadas de la violencia sistémica en contra de jóvenes negros y otras personas de color  en la historia contemporánea de los Estados Unidos han moldeado nuestro miedo, empatía y percepción. Creadas entre el año 2014 y 2019, las obras trazan las historias de alto perfil de las vidas perdidas o alteradas para siempre por los sistemas policíacos desde la década de 1970 hasta hoy en día.

 
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November 24, 2020 - May 24, 2021

The Bronx Museum of the Arts is expanding outside with #SeeMeBronx, an interactive project about visibility, intersectionality, and identity. The project kicks off the Museum's 50th anniversary, which is focused on visibility as a tenet of social justice. As we take off into our next fifty years, we hope to reaffirm our mission as an admission-free, liberated space for communities to come to enjoy art and have important conversations. #SeeMeBronx was created as a way to spark conversations within our many intersecting communities about identity, equity, and inclusion. Sometimes the best way to dive into dialogue is by asking tough but important questions. We hope you will join us in shaping the conversation with your queries. 

 

Upcoming

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October 20, 2021 - January 16, 2022

This fall, the Museum will showcase Bronx Calling: The Fifth AIM Biennial, an exhibition series highlighting artists from the Bronx Museum’s AIM professional development fellowship program. Since its inception, AIM has supported over 1,200 artists, including Diana Al-Hadid, Firelei Báez, Njideka Akunili Crosby, Abigail DeVille, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Glenn Ligon, Sarah Oppenheimer, Jacolby Satterwhite, and Lucia Hierro. The fifth iteration of Bronx Calling will showcase the work of 69 New York City-based emerging artists from the 2018 and 2019 cycles.

 

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April 28, 2021 - September 12, 2021

Born In Flames: Feminist Futures​ dives into the speculative, globally informed visions of artists who explore the possibilities of new futures. This group exhibition of femme-identified artists critically examines current struggles for equity by exploring strategies for justice and equality through multifaceted futurisms. Including works created over the last five decades, the show demonstrates not only the artists' place within a futurist lineage, but also exposes the ongoing impulse to imagine new realities on their own terms. Artists Include: Caitlin Cherry​, Chitra Ganesh​, Clarissa Tossin, Huma Bhaba, Firelei Baez, Lizzie Borden​, Maria Berrio, Pamela Phatsimo Sunstrum, Rose B. Simpson, Saya Woolfalk, Shoshanna Weinberger, Tourmaline, Wangechi Mutu, and Sin Wai Kin fka Victoria Sin. 

Past

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South Bronx Waterfront Sagas
November 2, 2016 to February 19, 2017

Linda Cunningham explores the issues of time, transience, and contradictions through images of the shifting urban present. Environmental concerns juxtaposed against industry, urban blight, and the loss of the natural environment drive her practice, in addition to gentrification and the changing landscape of the Bronx, her home for many years. 

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November 2, 2016 – January 1, 2017

As a participant of the 1980s generation of artists that came of out of the Instituto Superior de Art (ISA), in Havana, Quisqueya Henriquez was deeply influenced by the conceptual and experimental pedagogical model promoted by ISA at the time. With a career spanning over twenty years, Henriquez has carefully built a coherent body of work that sustains a critical dialogue with international currents while also sharply tuned to Caribbean contemporary life and culture. Henriquez’s first mid-career survey was organized by the Bronx Museum in 2007.

 

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October 12, 2016 to February 12, 2017
The Neighbors, part two, in two parts: Sanctuary: Andrea Bowers and Home: Andrea Aragón establishes a dialogue on immigration through the work of American artist Andrea Bowers and Guatemalan photographer Andrea Aragón. This is the second iteration in the exhibition series The Neighbors, which addresses issues surrounding cultural uprooting and belonging, as well as social mobility and political resistance. 
 
 
 
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Symposium
September 15, 2016 to February 19, 2017

September 15, 2016 to February 19, 2017

 

Robert Raphael’s ceramic-based work draws on the complex history of decorative art, a tradition that intersects and runs parallel to the history of art. Rather than interpreting ornamentation as superficial, Raphael believes that the strength of decoration lies in its seductive nature and the complex meanings that often result when surface, mass, pattern, and cultural history conflate.

 

For the installation at The Bronx Museum of the Arts Raphael’s work focuses on classical ornamentation and its prevalence from historical time through to contemporary society. 

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July 13 to October 23, 2016

July 13 to October 23, 2016

 

This summer The Bronx Museum of the Arts will present Art AIDS America, the first exhibition to examine the deep and ongoing influence of the AIDS crisis on American art and culture. The exhibition will feature more than 125 works in a wide range of media dating from 1981 to the present day, by artists including Félix González-Torres, Derek Jackson, Kia Labeija, Annie Leibovitz, Robert Mapplethorpe, and Martin Wong. The exhibition, on view from July 13 through October 23,2016,  is organized by the Tacoma Art Museum in partnership with The Bronx Museum of the Arts.

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July 13 to October 23, 2016

 

In 2007, the Museum of Modern Art exhibited a series of drawings by French post-Impressionist painter and draftsman Georges Seurat. Frank Gimpaya was taken by the painter’s 1882 rendering of The Veil.  He was inspired to create a photographic tableau of this drawing as a means of instruction for the photography classes he taught at Saint Peter's University in Jersey City, New Jersey.

 
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July 13 to September 25, 2016

July 13 to September 25, 2016

 

Caza: Rochele Gomez, Margaret Lee, Alejandra Seeber is part of The Neighbors, a series of three small-scale, successive exhibitions of contemporary art organized by guest curator Sofía Hernández Chong Cuy for The Bronx Museum of the Arts. 

 

What would it mean to tame art? And, what or whom would this taming of art serve? The group exhibition Caza—a word that in Spanish means “searching” or “hunting,” and is a homophone of “casa” (home)—is an attempt to respond to such questions, or an occasion to at least consider them. 

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Organized by the Tampa Museum of Art in collaboration with the Bronx Museum of the Arts
October 8, 2016 to February 5, 2017

On view at the Tampa Museum of Art.

 

Complicated Beauty, a survey exhibition of contemporary Cuban art from the 1970s to the present, will be the first of several Cuban art exhibitions at the Museum. Inspired by historic connections between Tampa and Havana, as well as the recent reopening of relations between the US and Cuba, Complicated Beauty will highlight several recent acquisitions to the Tampa Museum of Art’s permanent collection, including Simply Beautiful by Mabel Poblet and Cada Sonido es una Forma del Tiempo (Every Sound is a Shape of Time) by Glenda León. Alongside these and other artworks from the Tampa collection, the exhibition will also include numerous loaned artworks from the collections of the Bronx Museum of the Arts and several private collections.

 

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April 6 to May 30, 2016

April 6 to May 30, 2016

 

Focusing initially on artists of African, Asian and Latin American descent, the Bronx Museum Permanent Collection was created in 1986 with the goal to reflect the borough's dynamic communities. Beyond The Veil focuses on an eclectic group of contemporary artists in the Permanent Collection whose works convey the complex mediation between the self and the other, between one’s allegiance to tradition and the appeal of globalism.

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Spotlight: John Ahearn and Rigoberto Torres

 

This exhibition highlights a group of sculptures by John Ahearn and Rigoberto Torres in the Bronx Museum Permanent Collection. Whether produced individually or in collaboration, this series of works convey both artists’ commitment to representing their local communities. John Ahearn moved from downtown Manhattan to the South Bronx in 1979 and began making his first casts of local residents at Fashion Moda, an alternative gallery that thrived in the South Bronx during the 1980s and early 1990s. It was during one of these live casting sessions that Rigoberto Torres met Ahearn. As it happened, Torres had already been introduced to casting and painting at his uncle’s statuary factory. At first, Torres volunteered as a model and later became Ahearn’s long-time collaborator. Over the span of a 30-year career, Ahearn and Torres have exhibited their work widely across the United States, Europe, and Latin America.  

 

In addition to works previously collected by the Bronx Museum, the present exhibition also includes a suite of busts recently donated by Krasdale Foods, Inc. that were originally exhibited at their Community Gallery in the early 1980s. Transforming the everyday man, woman, and child into monumental works of art, these casts evidence the trust and respect that both Ahearn and Torres established with South Bronx residents. 

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March 2 to May 29, 2016

March 2 to May 29, 2016

 

Since 2007 Michele Brody has been serving tea to the public through the interactive community-based project Reflections in Tea.  The ritual performance of preparing loose-leaf tea within special paper filters is shared with individuals and groups. The participants’ conversations are then preserved by being transcribed onto the stained tea bags that have been dried and flattened, culminating in the creation of an ever-growing set of fluttering paper quilts. Through the experience of reading participants’ stories, Reflections in Tea reflects back to the public both a visual and visceral experience of their collective memories and experiences.

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February 24 to May 8, 2016

February 24 to May 8, 2016

 

Since the mid-1990s, Jill Baroff has been strongly influenced by Japanese architecture, which she categorizes as “floor-based,” as opposed to the West’s emphasis on verticality. During a six-month NEA fellowship in Japan, Baroff was captivated by the way light traveled across the weave of her tatami floor during the day; constantly changing the patterns of the mats and consequently affecting the shape and feel of the interior spaces she occupied. In 1997, for an exhibition in Germany, Baroff achieved the same kind of effect using corrugated paper. For the installation at the Bronx Museum Terrace, Baroff chose to work with tree trunks collected from a grove in Upstate New York.

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February 3 to June 26, 2016

February 3 to June 26, 2016

 

Widely recognized as one of the very few female pioneers of Land Art, artist Michelle Stuart is known for her nature-based art dating to the late 1960s and 1970s. Comparatively lesser-known are her remarkable photographic works, which constitute a crucial part of her oeuvre and have been her primary focus over the past several years.

 

Organized by guest curator Gregory Volk, the exhibition consists of twelve recent large-scale works—including a major wall piece created specifically for this exhibition—as well as two important pieces from the early 1980s that can be seen as precursors to Stuart’s later direction.  This exhibition is the first museum treatment of Stuart’s photography-based works.

 

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April 6 to June 26, 2016

April 6 to June 26, 2016

 

The South Bronx Trades series, initiated in 2011 and still in progress, documents the active industries and manufacturing enterprises of Port Morris and Hunts Point, revealing to the viewer the unseen places and unheralded workers of the South Bronx. In contrast with the grim imagery often associated with the South Bronx, Fougeron’s photographs show us that industry persists and thrives in the borough. 

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April 6 to June 26, 2016

April 6 to June 26, 2016

 

The works in Bronx Focus: Paintings by Valeri Larko serve as a record of the vibrant graffiti culture as displayed in structures throughout the borough now, and on the verge of extinction. Larko’s paintings remind viewers of a Bronx that coexists as both a city and nature reserve, capable of gritty and touching beauty, while also focusing on themes of memory, preservation, and expansion.