Current

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November 10, 2021 - March 20, 2022

From November 10, 2021, to March 20, 2022, the Bronx Museum will present Bronx Calling: The Fifth AIM Biennial showcasing the work of 68 early career artists from the 2018 and 2019 cycles of the Bronx Museum’s AIM Fellowship program. The fifth edition of Bronx Calling is co-organized by Ian Cofre (Director, PS 122 Gallery) and Eva Mayhabal Davis (Co-Director, Transmitter).

 

Upcoming

September 2023 - February 2024 (exact dates to be determined)

A long awaited, posthumous retrospective of artist Tina Girouard, a pioneer in performing art installations, dance, decorative art and video. Girouard played a catalytic role in the 1970s SoHo art scene in New York City, helping to found the experimental gallery 112 Greene Street and the artist-run restaurant Food.

May - August 2023 (exact dates to be determined)

As moving as it is complex, the multifaceted work of Darrel Ellis (1958–1992) restages a lost vision of Black selfhood and domesticity. His oeuvre has presented a formidable challenge to curators and scholars over the last thirty years for its unfinished tenor, a perception heightened by his untimely death due to AIDS-related causes at age 33. Although Ellis’ work was included in important contemporary surveys during his lifetime, including the 1989 exhibition Witnesses:  Against Their Vanishing, organized by Nan Goldin, only now is it beginning to garner the attention it deserves. The exhibition Darrel Ellis: Regeneration offers the first comprehensive, scholarly survey of this pioneering artist, whose highly original merging of painting, printmaking, and photography anticipated current artistic interest in archive, appropriation, and personal narrative.

October 26, 2022 - April 30, 2023

This large-scale survey exhibition will feature over 120 artworks and archival materials spanning four decades of the artists' careers drawn from the Bronx Museum’s Permanent Collection as well as from private collections. In addition, works in the artists' personal collections will be shown in public for the first time, together with rarely seen Polaroid photographs of the South Bronx residents portrayed in their sculptures. A catalog will feature a graphic novel about the people in the portraits, as well as amply illustrated essays by noted scholars. The interactive exhibition design will be created by Bronx-based architect Jorge Plazas (Sir David Adjaye's collaborator) and Darío Nuñez-Ameni (Bronx-born artist Vito Acconci's studio architect).

October 12, 2022 - April 9, 2023

Abigail DeVille: Bronx Heavens examines the myths and realities of local, familial and ancestral histories and the convoluted notion of freedom in a country fraught with oppression and racism.  In particular, The Bronx has served as a sanctuary for immigrant and migrant communities over the last 120 years, including for Abigail DeVille and several generations of her family who have lived in the area and were part of the Great Migration. With a humanizing lens, DeVille’s work utilizes found materials and detritus to unearth forgotten narratives of communities of color. When these communities seek to reach another realm in pursuit of happiness, what does freedom mean? DeVille describes freedom as “amorphous, shapeshifting, and elusive” as her work further explores issues of identity, culture, and class. 

April 27, 2022 - October 9, 2022

Celebrating the Bronx Museum’s 50th anniversary, this exhibition pays homage to the generosity of hundreds of supporters who have contributed to our Permanent Collection now encompassing 2,500 works of art in all media. The thematic layout of the exhibition will present new acquisitions, alongside seldom seen treasures with a strong emphasis on art that relates to the Bronx, the Latinx experience, the African diaspora, Latin America, and the Caribbean. These permanent holdings testify to the Bronx Museum’s ambition to provide enriching experiences, connections and engagement with great art for the benefit of our Bronx communities and beyond. 

April 6, 2022 - September 4, 2022

Starting at the young age of fifteen, Brooklyn born photographer Jamel Shabazz identified early on the core subject of his lifelong investigation: the men and women, young and old, who invest the streets of New York City with a high degree of theater and style, mixing traditions and cultures. Despite following a celebrated tradition of street photography that includes Gordon Parks, Garry Winogrand, and Lee Friedlander, it is to his credit that Shabazz has been one of the first photographers to realize the joyous, infectious potential of youth culture in neighborhoods such as East New York, Cypress Hill, East Flatbush and Bed-Stuy. A formidable archive of New York’s diverse communities in the outer boroughs, this exhibition pays homage to Jamel Shabazz’s illustrious career of over forty years documenting the vibrant interaction of New Yorkers with their neighborhoods. 

Past

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September 25, 2019 to March 8, 2020

Widely regarded as one of the most significant documentarians of street art, Henry Chalfant has produced a voluminous body documenting the emergence of the trend since its early days in the Bronx, following its transformation into the international phenomenon it is today. Chalfant’s photographs are a work of visual anthropology and one of the seminal documents of American popular culture in the late twentieth century. 

 

 

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August 7, 2019 to February 9, 2020

A quiet man who supported himself doing odd jobs such as street vendor, jewelry designer, photography printer, and cab driver, Bronx native Alvin Baltrop left an important body of work after his untimely death in 2004 that only now is garnering the serious attention it deserves. Like the startling images of Peter Moore, Robert Mapplethorpe, Peter Hujar, and Gordon Matta-Clark, the photographs of Alvin Baltrop memorialize New York City at a breaking-point moment amid ruin and chaos.

 

 

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This program features a collection of documentary videos created by participants in The Bronx Museum’s Teen Council and Teen Summer programs. For over 14 years participants in these programs have interviewed artists, activists, and other community anchors to learn how they contribute to the richness of arts and culture in the Bronx and beyond. Through this process teens develop deep, career-enhancing skills and begin to see themselves as agents of change in their immediate communities and the wider world. 

 

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June 6, 2019 to June 29, 2019

The Bronx Museum of the Arts is pleased to present a solo exhibition of new photographs by AIM artist-in-residence Pacifico Silano that explore the vestiges of loss felt across the LGBTQ community owing to the 1980s AIDS crisis. The exhibition is presented in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising.

 

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May 8, 2019 to June 30, 2019

Organized by The Bronx Museum of the Arts Teen Council, Smells Like Teen Spirit features artwork created by New York City-based teen artists. Through an open call, young people were invited to submit artworks reflecting upon the experience of being a teenager today. From the submissions, Teen Council selected the artworks for their annual exhibition. 

 

 

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April 25, 2019 to May 18, 2019

 

My Home Has Wings / Mi Casa Tiene Alas features a selection of recent work on mobility and migration by AIM artist-in-residence Blanka Amezkua made in collaboration with Rene Mendoza.

 

My Home Has Wings is presented at The Bronx Museum's satellite project space, The Block Gallery, located in Lower Manhattan.

 

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March 27, 2019 to September 1, 2019

It has been a long tradition among philosophers and writers to praise uselessness as a means to stress the importance of spiritual activities and creations without clear functional aims. Aristotle, for one, established early on that knowledge was valuable in itself, not for providing practical utility—a notion frequently forgotten today. To praise inutility, thus, has been a reaction to the materialistic values promoted by capitalist society, which has been criticized for its lack of moral and spiritual values. 

 

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March 6, 2019 to July 21, 2019

Widely regarded as a pioneer of video art, peter campus creates complex installations that engage and amuse, while leading the viewer in a journey of discovery and self-awareness. From the early closed-circuit video installations he began making in 1971 to the more recent work, campus’ entire oeuvre deals with processes of perception and vision, exploiting the specific characteristics of both the electronic and the digital image. His work provides a unique experience for the visitor, who activates the work while exploring their own image.