Current

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November 10, 2021 - March 20, 2022

From November 10, 2021, to March 20, 2022, the Bronx Museum will present Bronx Calling: The Fifth AIM Biennial showcasing the work of 68 early career artists from the 2018 and 2019 cycles of the Bronx Museum’s AIM Fellowship program. The fifth edition of Bronx Calling is co-organized by Ian Cofre (Director, PS 122 Gallery) and Eva Mayhabal Davis (Co-Director, Transmitter).

 

Upcoming

September 2023 - February 2024 (exact dates to be determined)

A long awaited, posthumous retrospective of artist Tina Girouard, a pioneer in performing art installations, dance, decorative art and video. Girouard played a catalytic role in the 1970s SoHo art scene in New York City, helping to found the experimental gallery 112 Greene Street and the artist-run restaurant Food.

May - August 2023 (exact dates to be determined)

As moving as it is complex, the multifaceted work of Darrel Ellis (1958–1992) restages a lost vision of Black selfhood and domesticity. His oeuvre has presented a formidable challenge to curators and scholars over the last thirty years for its unfinished tenor, a perception heightened by his untimely death due to AIDS-related causes at age 33. Although Ellis’ work was included in important contemporary surveys during his lifetime, including the 1989 exhibition Witnesses:  Against Their Vanishing, organized by Nan Goldin, only now is it beginning to garner the attention it deserves. The exhibition Darrel Ellis: Regeneration offers the first comprehensive, scholarly survey of this pioneering artist, whose highly original merging of painting, printmaking, and photography anticipated current artistic interest in archive, appropriation, and personal narrative.

October 26, 2022 - April 30, 2023

This large-scale survey exhibition will feature over 120 artworks and archival materials spanning four decades of the artists' careers drawn from the Bronx Museum’s Permanent Collection as well as from private collections. In addition, works in the artists' personal collections will be shown in public for the first time, together with rarely seen Polaroid photographs of the South Bronx residents portrayed in their sculptures. A catalog will feature a graphic novel about the people in the portraits, as well as amply illustrated essays by noted scholars. The interactive exhibition design will be created by Bronx-based architect Jorge Plazas (Sir David Adjaye's collaborator) and Darío Nuñez-Ameni (Bronx-born artist Vito Acconci's studio architect).

October 12, 2022 - April 9, 2023

Abigail DeVille: Bronx Heavens examines the myths and realities of local, familial and ancestral histories and the convoluted notion of freedom in a country fraught with oppression and racism.  In particular, The Bronx has served as a sanctuary for immigrant and migrant communities over the last 120 years, including for Abigail DeVille and several generations of her family who have lived in the area and were part of the Great Migration. With a humanizing lens, DeVille’s work utilizes found materials and detritus to unearth forgotten narratives of communities of color. When these communities seek to reach another realm in pursuit of happiness, what does freedom mean? DeVille describes freedom as “amorphous, shapeshifting, and elusive” as her work further explores issues of identity, culture, and class. 

April 27, 2022 - October 9, 2022

Celebrating the Bronx Museum’s 50th anniversary, this exhibition pays homage to the generosity of hundreds of supporters who have contributed to our Permanent Collection now encompassing 2,500 works of art in all media. The thematic layout of the exhibition will present new acquisitions, alongside seldom seen treasures with a strong emphasis on art that relates to the Bronx, the Latinx experience, the African diaspora, Latin America, and the Caribbean. These permanent holdings testify to the Bronx Museum’s ambition to provide enriching experiences, connections and engagement with great art for the benefit of our Bronx communities and beyond. 

April 6, 2022 - September 4, 2022

Starting at the young age of fifteen, Brooklyn born photographer Jamel Shabazz identified early on the core subject of his lifelong investigation: the men and women, young and old, who invest the streets of New York City with a high degree of theater and style, mixing traditions and cultures. Despite following a celebrated tradition of street photography that includes Gordon Parks, Garry Winogrand, and Lee Friedlander, it is to his credit that Shabazz has been one of the first photographers to realize the joyous, infectious potential of youth culture in neighborhoods such as East New York, Cypress Hill, East Flatbush and Bed-Stuy. A formidable archive of New York’s diverse communities in the outer boroughs, this exhibition pays homage to Jamel Shabazz’s illustrious career of over forty years documenting the vibrant interaction of New Yorkers with their neighborhoods. 

Past

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This online exhibit presents art created and curated in the 2021 Teen Summer program at The Bronx Museum of the Arts in July-August 2021. Throughout the four weeks of this paid intensive program, two cohorts of teens participated in virtual studio sessions during which these pieces were created.

 

The exhibit is organized in three sections:

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June 23, 2021 – October 24, 2021

Amerika. God Bless You If It’s Good To You is an exhibition of flat works and performance collaborations of twelve new and recent drawings and mixed media collages by Harlem-based artist Wardell Milan. Split into two parts, the exhibition explores the undergirding of contemporary America. The first portion of the exhibition, comprising new works on paper, explores the insidious normalcy of White supremacy in America. At the heart of the exhibition is the question: “What do terrorists do when they’re not terrorizing?” This inquiry pushes the artist’s assertion that racial violence is interwoven into the fabric of American life, and is an indiscriminate presence in public and private realms––from the Bayou to the Bronx. The second section of the show, which is housed in a site-specific chapel structure, designed by Billy Ray Morgan, explores the idea of “Safe Space” for communities that have been historically oppressed. This chapel space, modeled after the Rothko Chapel, will set the stage for a series of collaborative performances, choreographed by Milan and Zachary Tye Richardson, and unpack the need for safety interlinked through histories of violence; to be affirmed and celebrated. Within this chapel, these irrepressible bodies cannot be flattened but must be reckoned with. 

 

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This exhibit was curated by the Spring 2021 Teen Council cohort at The Bronx Museum of the Arts. 

 

Teen Council writes: Over the past year, many dreams were lost and shattered due to the pandemic and hard circumstances in NYC. Time was paused and colorless, making us tend to envision Our Futures In Color.

 

This exhibit invited teen artists throughout New York to bring viewers into the world they dreamed of while in quarantine, whether that be Broadway or an imagined utopia.  

 

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May 17, 2021 - August 9, 2021

Shellyne Rodriguez is an artist, educator, writer, and community organizer based in the Bronx. Her practice utilizes text, drawing, painting, collage and sculpture to depict spaces and subjects engaged in strategies of survival against erasure and subjugation.  This collection of work depicts friends, comrades, and neighbors from the artist’s community in the places they live and hustle. 

 

Shellyne Rodriguez es artista, educadora, escritora y organizadora comunitaria basada en el Bronx. En Su práctica artística ella utiliza texto, dibujo, pintura, collage y escultura para retratar espacios, sujetos y sus estrategias de supervivencia para defenderse de la dominación la eliminación. Esta colección de obras retrata amistades, camaradas, vecinas y vecinos de la comunidad de la artista en los lugares donde viven y se buscan la vida.

 

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April 28, 2021 - September 26, 2021 (extended)

Born in Flames: Feminist Futures is a constellation of imagined world-scapes projected by fourteen contemporary artists. Set within the space of an exhibition, the artwork presented is a projection of the artists’ larger visions about futurity. Each section of the show is a microcosmic speculation on what could have been, what is, or what is to come. These worlds are steeped in lessons of our complicated pasts, peppered with the ravages of oppression but also blooming joys. Their work critically examines current struggles for equity by exploring strategies for justice and equality through multifaceted futurisms. 

 

Born in Flames: Feminist Futures (Nacer En Llamas: Futuros Feministas) es una constelación de mundos-paisajes imaginados en las proyecciones de quince artistas contemporáneas. Enmarcado en el espacio de una exhibición, las obras son una proyección de las visiones ampliadas de lxs artistas acerca de la futuridad. Cada sección de la muestra es una especulación micro cósmica de lo que podría haber sido, lo que es, y lo que está por venir.  Estos mundos están impregnados de las lecciones de nuestros complicados pasados, salpicados de los estragos de la opresión, pero también de las alegrías florecientes. Sus obras examinan críticamente las luchas actuales por la equidad a través de la exploración de estrategias para la justicia y la equidad a través de futurismos multifacéticas. 

 

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Home is a familiar place where you can find comfort in your surroundings. During the quarantine home has also become a space to learn, grow, build and rest. Each of the artworks we selected depicts our cultures and community as we see them. By showing the perspectives of the less represented lives of the people of New York we are centering the positive aspects of our city: our home.
 
This exhibit was curated by the Bronx Museum's Teen Council in the winter of 2020-21 and features works from the Museum's permanent collection.
 
 
El hogar es un lugar que se nos hace familiar donde una persona se encuentra cómoda con lo que le rodea. Durante la cuarentena el hogar se ha vuelto un espacio donde aprender y crecer, crear y descansar. Cada una de las obras que seleccionamos representan nuestras cultura y comunidades como las vemos. Al mostrar las perspectivas de las vidas con menos representación en la ciudad de Nueva York nos dedicamos a prestarle atención a los aspectos positivos de nuestra ciudad: nuestro hogar.
 

La curaduría de esta muestra estuvo a cargo del Concejo de jóvenes del Bronx durante el invierno del 2020-21 y presenta obras de la colección permanente del museo.

 

 

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January 21, 2021 - May 30, 2021

Shaun Leonardo: The Breath of Empty Space presents drawings by the Brooklyn-based artist that critique how mediated images of systemic violence against Black and Brown young men in contemporary American history have shaped our fear, empathy, and perception. Created between 2014 and 2019, the works trace high profile stories of lives ended or forever altered by systems of law enforcement from the 1970s to today. 

 

Shaun Leonardo: The Breath of Empty Space, El aliento del espacio vacío, presenta dibujos, del artista basado en Brooklyn, que critica cómo las imágenes mediatizadas de la violencia sistémica en contra de jóvenes negros y otras personas de color  en la historia contemporánea de los Estados Unidos han moldeado nuestro miedo, empatía y percepción. Creadas entre el año 2014 y 2019, las obras trazan las historias de alto perfil de las vidas perdidas o alteradas para siempre por los sistemas policíacos desde la década de 1970 hasta hoy en día.